Badger Damage

Discussion in 'Plant Pests, Diseases and Weeds' started by Palustris, May 8, 2016.

  1. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

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    There are at least three badger setts within a mile of us, that I know of. there may be more, so catching them and moving one would probably be a futile procedure. They are protected animals unless the Gov't wants to kill them. Local farmers do not want these ones to be removed as they are free from Bovine TB and they are worried that a new set of badgers would move in to fill the space and have the disease.
     
  2. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

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    Well, that is another length of fencing installed. Cost only a sliced to the bone finger, a badly bruised forehead where I leant into a branch. We had to cut down a Cotoneaster tree which was leaning over the fence, hundreds of yards of my bete noir, Roses, (I utterly detest roses, cannot for the life of me see why anyone would ever willingly plant them) and thousands of feet of Ivy. My hands are scratched to death and if the !"£!""£ come back in I will seriously consider a gun and an all night watch, even if it is illegal. We have trampled down heaven knows what plants in the border in trying to reach the fence and both of us are utterly exhausted.
     
  3. Jerry Sullivan

    Jerry Sullivan Garden Experimenter Plants Contributor

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    I am a bit late to this thread but as to how the Badgers are getting into the garden. Animals ignore many things, for instance a small stick in the ground. They will knock it over in their direction of travel. Strategically placed along the perimeter, may, when pushed over, indicate their entrance and direction of travel. I have used the method to determine if a creature hole is occupied or abandoned.

    Jerry
     
  4. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

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    The perimeter of our property is a strip of uncultivated land. It is very easy to see where the badgers are making paths through the weeds. The problem is that an awful lot of the edge is unreachable by us, because of the nature of the undergrowth. Much of it is bramble, ivy and such like. Each time we have managed to clear a patch we have found a possible entry point and blocked it, so they go looking for another. Hopefully now we have fenced in the whole of the most likely access side, they will stop coming in. Hah!
    If not then we will have to buy some more fencing and carry on.
     
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  5. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Ach...what an irritating and frustrating situation they have caused you and your bride. Keep us posted on the development.
     
  6. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

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    No signs of any incursion last night.
    My finger is painful and I have a lump on my forehead.
    Just read that many of the old remedies are now illegal.
     
  7. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

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    Spent the morning filling in the dug holes with top soil. 4 big barrow loads. At least now we will be able to see if they are digging more and if we have managed to block off their entrance.
     
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  8. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    :fingerscrossed:---I hope that does the trick.
     
  9. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

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    What about the solar powered electric fencing ? The one we bought had a two mile charge length. They are fairly inexpensive $129. and the wire and insulators are reasonable. Since badgers are low to the ground you could run two strands at the appropriate height. Just make it one continuous run. You could run it to the inside of the brambles Its very obscure and unobtrusive once it is installed so wouldn`t take away from your flowers. Worked great for keeping our horses out of the garden. Only thing to upkeep is to not let weeds grow up and touch the wire, That will direct the charge down the weed and into the ground. Packs quite a wallop if you are a critter !
     
  10. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

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    No damage for a couple of nights now so fingers crossed. As I said before, the only way to put an electric barrier round would be in the field around us and the farmer would not let us. It would also involve strimming the weeds from the 3 metre wild life strip which is left round the field for the pheasants. Again, not allowable.
    We have found a cheaper source of wire fencing ,so we are going to buy some more, enough to complete the circuit and we will keep it in reserve if they return.
    Thanks for the advice and sympathy.
     
  11. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

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    More damage than ever last night. They have now started on another section of the garden. No tulips in it, but there are, or were crocus bulbs. I give up. Definitely going to dig everything out and grass over the whole garden and sell it as paddock for a horse.
     
  12. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

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    Good heavens, you are having a time of it with those badgers. My sympathy is of no help, but it is heartfelt. We have armadilloes that make ankle-breaking holes in the lawn--but not as damaging as badgers.
     
  13. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

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    They have also been digging at the bottom of the garden. Bees nest I think. That means they are getting in somewhere else too!
    Moles do ankle breaking holes in the grass!
     

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