Blank Spots on my lawn, help

Discussion in 'Lawn Care' started by blazr79, Jun 30, 2014.

  1. blazr79

    blazr79 New Seed

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    All,
    please help me to figure what to do with the area behind the house to get it filled with grass. I believe that the grass is Bermuda crawling grass.

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  3. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

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    My experience has been that too much shade makes for only moss to grow. Is this deep shade, dry shade, damp shade??? Heavy traffic will kill off most grass. I know nothing about burmuda grass, so I don't know how hardy it is to foot traffic, But if I remember correctly it should be fairly hardy. Maybe you need to spray a fungicide on what you have first and then reseed it this Fall. Fall is the time to reseed or overseed anyway. Then you may be able to keep everyone off of it until new grass is established.
     
  4. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    That does appear to be Bermuda grass and it doesn't grow in shade of any kind. I would suggest you contact your local County Extension office http://mecklenburg.ces.ncsu.edu/ and ask about local grasses that will do well in shade/part shade and handle heavy foot traffic from children playing on it.

    Bermuda is one of the more expensive grasses to get started and maintain, in good growing conditions it needs to be mowed at least twice a week and is a real water guzzler.
     
  5. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

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    One problem I see is the tree roots almost on top of the ground which is sapping all the moisture. That looks like coastal Bermuda which has to be sprigged Common Bermuda can be seeded. Usually coastal Bermuda once established, will literally grow on concrete. WE have it in our pasture and or lawn and everywhere else we don`t want it,,like the garden which is a battle every year. It does like full sun and lots of water to be a thick grass. Is yours putting out runners ? Each joint on the runners will root with enough water. Can`t remember offhand but I think common Bermuda is a little less demanding of sunlight but if it were me,, I would start watering that area well each week especially the spots of grass, then overseed with a little common Bermuda or a blend of grasses specifically for shade. Scratch the surface of the ground before seeding it, then water well.
     



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  6. Tooty2shoes

    Tooty2shoes Hardy Maple

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    Blazr79-I would forget the grass and make it into a shade flower garden. You could incorporate the two trees on either side and make it into a beautiful garden. If you like you could put down a wood mulch path around it. Or make two smaller gardens and have the path go threw the middle from your patio area.
     
  7. GreekYogurt

    GreekYogurt New Seed

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    Just buy a deep shade grass mix. You may have to reseed the area a few times before all the areas get filled in. Keep off the area while you seed it.
     
  8. Kate Louise

    Kate Louise New Seed

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    If its under trees then don't plant some grass because it won't grow well. But if its around a good area with lots of sunlight you should use good manure such as compost to grow it.
     
  9. Jani May

    Jani May New Seed

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    Try using mycorrhizae and compost tea while getting more light on to your yard
     

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