How do I grow this lavender???

Discussion in 'Herb Gardening' started by Ronni, May 3, 2016.

  1. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Hiya Ronni--I can tell you that it never occurred to me that your posting was rude. So then--absolutely no apology necessary, sweet lady.
    I do not have "long toes", as we say here--meaning that you can't easily hurt my feelings. I believe that there is a similar english saying-- "stepping on someone's toes". Right?

    Thanks for your kind thoughts though--it reflects your golden personality.
     
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  2. Sydney Smith

    Sydney Smith In Flower

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    Hi. Have always had Lavender in the garden - full sun and well drained soil ( as with most silver/grey/blue foliaged plants).
    Given time the plants do get "woody" but a very light trim over of the dead flowers when they are finished tidies & helps I have found. Have regularly had self sown seedlings.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2016
  3. SadSunday

    SadSunday New Seed

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    Ronni, your lavender looks great! So beautiful. I had zero luck with this plant myself. Had some lavender seeds, thought it would be nice to grow in a pot, but small stems (1-2 cm) just started to dry out from the bottom to the upper parts, and nothing grew into a full plant. Will try again in the summer thou. And I won't love it to death :D
     
  4. Islandlife

    Islandlife Young Pine

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    I have a couple of kinds of lavender. It is planted out front along the edge of the garden, gets minimal water and is thriving. I did buy another one and had it in a pot out on the deck. It kinda rotted from the inside out and I deduced that I was probably watering it too much.
     



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  5. Little-sister

    Little-sister New Seed

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    May I ask a question here.........I'm in z5 in Michigan. I just last some lavender in my garden last year. Yes we get the snow and freezes. So should I expect my lavendar to not return? I was really hoping for it to come back.
     
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  6. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    What species was your Lavender, some species are good up to zone 5 and some can not live through cold north of zone 8.
     
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  7. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    That's a tough one, Sis.
    Some lavender sorts stand have quite cold temps...what they cannot tolerate so well is moist "feet" for an extended period of time. Poor, sandy and chalky soil will be a good milieu for your plant....the drainage, you see.
    It might to worth your while to use a bit of fleece and see where the ship strands (so to speak), this spring.
    Good luck.
     
  8. Ronni

    Ronni Young Pine

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    Hey Sjoerd? It may be the language issue, it may be I'm just not familiar with the term. But I have NO idea what you're saying here! :heart:;)

    And just as an aside, speaking of language differences, I have adopted your your "long toes" saying from one of your earlier posts. It roughly parallels a saying we have here, about stepping on someone's toes i.e. offending them, encroaching on their area of responsibility etc.

    I get a chuckle out of telling people I don't have "long toes" when they think they may have offended me (which is an actual fallacy, because physiologically speaking, I do ;)) I watch their befuddlement as they try and figure out what I mean. It's even funnier when I use the saying during the warm months, because I mostly always wear flip flops, and I get such a tickle watching the person I'm talking to actually look down at my feet when I use the expression! :smt043:rofl:
     
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  9. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Chuckle...please excuse the use of an Anglicized Dutch term. You know Ronni, there are so many expressions in dutch that come from english ones, that I really do not know what is known and what is not. More and more english words and phrases are creeping into our language these days.

    The term, "and see where the ship strands", means "...and see what happens". Like you might say, "Let's just try this, and see what happens". Then we would insert the term , " and see where the ship strands" here. So when I suggested using fleece to protect the lavender to possibly help the plant with coldness and wetness issues---I am saying "I don't know if this will help or not, just try it and see how it goes"...or "see if it does make a difference".
    Or one might say that he will try something and see later how it works out.
    The Dutch is: "zien waar het schip strandt".

    One uses this term when the results of a solution is uncertain.

    And then you using the "long toe" term over there. It is so close to the english term of stepping on one's toes, that I would think that many folks might quickly see the connection between the two. I would like to be a fly on the wall when you are using that term there though. That sounds really funny.
     
  10. Ronni

    Ronni Young Pine

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    Sjoerd, a dear friend of mine is Dutch. She's across the world from me, but we communicate via Facebook, and another private forum I created to keep in touch with my many friends from across the world. I frequently chuckle over Katinka's phrasing, and sometimes we (her friends) have to struggle to understand something she's said. Occasionally miss the more subtle nuances.

    So...back to what you said earlier. When you talked about using fleece, did that mean use some kind of material to cover the lavender? So.....use the material to cover the lavender and then see what happens?
     
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  11. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Yes...I use what we call "fleece" to cover and protect various plants...like strawbs in bloom and tender blueberry buds. I have seen fields in Tennessee covered with some sort of white cloth to protect young tobacco plants. I think that that might have been some sort of muslin or something like that.

    I tried to find a translation for the fleece...but all that I could find was, "horticultural fleece".
    Check this website out: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=906

    How nice that you have a foreign friend in the Netherlands. I'll bet that she could help you if I write something that you do not understand. hahaha.
    I hope that you do not have trouble trying to decipher my ramblings on here. I think that I speak english well, but that is because I spent many years in your country. Still I sometimes do not get the grammar and words right always. I realize from myself, that I am not always clear when I write things on here....but if folks ask, like you did... I make an extra effort to write more clearly. My bride used to teach english here and she sometimes finds things that I write on here that can be said in a better way.

    At any rate...was I clear about the fleece? I wonder if you might call it , "gauze"? Probably not as when I think of gauze I think of a completely different cloth weave from fleece. Additionaly, I ought to mention the what we call horticultural fleece is nowhere like the fleece that one wears as a rap.

    Clear as mud?
     
  12. Islandlife

    Islandlife Young Pine

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    Floating Row Crop Cover is what I'd ask for if I was in a store trying to find this ....
     
  13. hummerbum

    hummerbum In Flower

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    Oh my goodness...this is why I come to this forum. Everyone knows what they're doing!! That lavender is gorgeous. Great job Ronni!!
     
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