Changing From Cooking On Gas To Electric

Discussion in 'Recipes and Cooking' started by Daniel W, Jul 3, 2022.

  1. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

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    We decided to buy an electric range, after getting the latest propane bill. The company tripled the price! Along with the tank rental, a one year propane supply now costs the same as a new, good quality electric range. Every year. That, along with the propane company's general unreliability and obnoxiousness (they really were) and the tank rental, and no good alternative suppliers here, and the tank gauge never worked so we never knew when we were running out until it was gone, plus in the extreme heat last year the line blew a gasket and we had to evacuate for a day... it was time to replace the gas range with electric. So we did.

    So far so good. One thing I don't like - we always used cast iron, but with a glass top electric range, cast iron can scratch the glass too much. So I can't use cast iron on the stovetop any more. I tried a stainless steel skillet - great for scrambling or frying eggs, sauté onions and mushrooms, but tofu stuck badly and burnt onto the skillet. It took me an hour of scouring to clean it up. So some learning is needed. The "ring of fire" burners on the gas range cooked things in the cast iron skillet unevenly, so omelet, for example, would be soupy in the middle when the outer part was already done. This electric burner cooks the bottom of the stainless steel skillet evenly, which is a nice surprise. Very nice omelet!

    The new electric oven bakes more evenly than our old gas range did, and preheats faster too. I'm surprised! I baked a loaf of sandwich bread - browned perfectly, and more evenly than the old oven.

    [​IMG]

    Gingersnaps were, if anything, a bit better with this oven. Lighter and with more "snap". Roasted potato wedges too. Sort of pillowy with crisp browned outsides. It has an air fry function that I cant seem to get working as nice as our existing stand-alone air fryer appliance, however.

    I do like that now I don't have to worry about accidentally leaving the gas on without a burner being lit, and blowing up the house. Not that it's likely, except maybe in an earthquake or something. Also, our gas range valves and jets tended to wear out in three or four years, and replacement is expensive. I don't know if there will be problems with the electric parts, but at least no corrosive gasses causing problems. The spark starters on our gas range also wore out too fast. Electric doesn't have those.

    So it's a learning process. I didn't want the glass cooking surface, but I guess I'll adapt. I know it should be easier to keep clean, but is also easily damaged. I'm surprised I like the oven better than gas - I thought gas was supposed to bake more evenly.

    Meanwhile, if we can figure out how to connect the old range to a portable tank, which is a LOT less costly (a LOT less) we may construct an outdoor summer kitchen for occasional cooking on hot days. I don't know yet if that's possible.

    Next: fig bars. Or apricot bars. And another whole wheat bread loaf with molasses and dates.
     
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  3. Droopy

    Droopy Slug Slaughterer Plants Contributor

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    Welcome to the world of glass stovetops and the hair-tearing learning process of new oven! I really hope you'll be pleased with it after all the problems you've had with the gas company and the bits and pieces of your gas range. We had to install new top and oven six years ago and I'm still trying to figure out how not to burn things on there and in there. (I don't cook very often you see.)

    You will share your outdoor gas cooking range if you can make it work, right?
     
  4. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

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    Thanks @Droopy. I think electric range will work out, there is just a learning curve.

    Here is the start of the outdoor cooking station as of today. The framing is mostly repurposed lumber, but in excellent condition. I will add stone tile to the concrete patio there (left over from a house remodel) to lift the stove slightly above the paved level, then move the old gas stove there. The stove will be located where the step ladder is resting now.

    [​IMG]

    This is the back of the house, and is on the East side where it will be out of direct sun in afternoon and evening. The roof will be clear to provide some light.

    We still need to find an adapter to connect the stove to a portable grill propane tank. If that is even possible. I think it should be OK.

    Rufus is watching through his doggie door LOL.
     
  5. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    I used some tools and smoothed my cast iron and then reseasoned it so I can use.it on my glass top stove. Some new pieces csame too rough for my taste so I smoothed the all. Lemme tell you the dust will rust! Careful where you work if you do it, there are videos all over youtube on the various methods.

    I would enjoy the magnetic cook tops. May just one large countertop eye? Very precise heat control. Cast iron is made for them I suspect. I have thought about carbon steel pans but have not tried anything new in a long time.
     



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  6. Doghouse Riley

    Doghouse Riley Young Pine

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    One of the advantages of using electricity for cooking is that you can have a halogen hob.
    We've two. They can be put away almost imediately after use. Cleaning is just a wipe over with a damp paper towel as they are never hot to the touch so nothing burns on them.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2022
  7. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    I still think the induction design will last longer and since heat is all above in the pan perhaps even cleanup might be easier. Of course I am a boilover threat at any moment. Still if the boover (*boil-over) hits a cool surface that has to be easier to get up.
     
  8. marlingardener

    marlingardener Mighty Oak

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    Daniel, we have a glass top electric stove, and I use my cast iron pans on it. I'm just careful to not "scoot" the pans on the burners. I've had no problems with scratching, marring, or difficult cleaning on the glass top.
    Our two ovens are electric also--small and larger. They bake evenly and within the time frame of the recipe.
    We changed from gas when we saw the local gas company dig up, replace, dig up, replace, and dig up the gas lines. Not propane, but still could make a "boom". I think you'll like your electric appliances.
     
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  9. Logan

    Logan Hardy Maple

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    That's great @Daniel W that you have a electric cooker. I've always had electric and have a ceramic hob cooker for 3 years now. The heat is there straight away but it stays there for a while when it's turned off. When i first had it i forgot that the hob would still be hot and cleaned it with a microfiber cloth and it melted on it, had to find out how to remove it and it's ok now. The oven is good but even with the fan on there's still hot spots and have to turn things like pastry. Have a special cleaner for the hob to protect it. You'll get used to it eventually and you'll wonder what was all the fuss about.
     
  10. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

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    Thanks all for the great comments.
    Today it's raining, soma good day to do some baking in the new stove. For starters, a loaf of bread and some macadamia nut white chocolate cookies.
     
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  11. Melody Mc.

    Melody Mc. Young Pine

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    Congratuations on the new stove! Very exciting.

    I think it is fabulous that you are building an outdoor kitchen! I'm very jealous of the full size oven idea.

    We are fortunate to have a large covered porch off of the kitchen, and I do all of my canning and blanching outside on a portable induction burner now. I used to use the gas burner on the BBQ but the induction is so much faster and more affordable with the cost of propane. In the heat of summer I have a toaster oven, air fryer and rotissarie that all live outside for outdoor cooking.

    I feel your propane pain. We had quite a few issues with our last delivery. We usually get two a year, and each one now isn't shy off of $2500.00, especially when the delivery charge of two hours each way if factored in. It is our only option next to electric, or wood. It runs our hot water, two small wall furnaces in the kids rooms, one larger furnace that is only used as back up in the main part of the house ( we set the thermostat at 10 C when we go to town for example) and most importantly the generator which runs most of the house when the power goes out ( lots).

    We've had to get pretty creative over the years with propane/gas conversions and adaptors. We can bypass our big tank and hook up propane bottles if need be for the house and the generator. I'm optomistic that you'll be able to find a conversion/adaptor kit somewhere for your stove.

    I have one of those glass top stoves/ovens. I gave up my large cast iron because apparently, next to scratching, my ancient and now very retired repair service man Phil, told me that the larger older cast iron pans can radiat heat back into the cook top, causing the very expensive element to burn out. I do use them outside on the gas burner.

    I have this blue steel pan that I love. which helped me part from the cast iron. It sells as a crepe pan, but I only have it reserved for eggs. It is fabulous for eggs and omlettes and doesn't scratch ( smooth bottom and not heavy) . Never sticks as long as it gets a shot of cooking spray first. I keep one just for eggs, and have another for searing meat etc. ( the lady told me if I cook something besides eggs in it, the next time eggs would stick. OR she wanted to sell two pans hahaha) I'm sure in the USA you'd have a better selection and price. I'd really miss not having it since parting with my cast iron. I found mine years ago at a kitchen shop, but they are on Amazon.



    https://www.debuyer.com/en/steel-pancake-pans-force-plus-1398.html
     
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  12. EmilySimpson

    EmilySimpson New Seed

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    I like to cook a lot too, I usually cook something with meat. Any meat is cut into portions. In the cauldron, https://www.amazon.com/pie-iron-for-campfire-cooking/dp/B088H42W2L, pour water at the rate of 0.5 liters per person and put the meat. The broth boils for about two hours. Then you need to add vegetables: potatoes, fried onions, black pepper, and salt. Boil until ready. Just before serving, add a bay leaf and any fresh herbs.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2022
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  13. Doghouse Riley

    Doghouse Riley Young Pine

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    You can't beat induction hobs.
    They're cheap, around fifty quid, we've had two for ten years. Thery are cool to touch and after a wipe over immediately after use, you can put them away in a cupboard or drawer as soon as the fan stops which is usually less than two minutes after use.

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. Tetters

    Tetters In Flower

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    Daniel, I'm afraid your pan with the stuck on scrambled egg would have been a goner had it been mine :rolleyes: I find it much easier to use a microwave for that job - a little bit of fat in the bowl, butter or oil, ad the eggs and seasoning, and away you go. Much easier to clean up:D
     
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  15. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

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    Daniel. I have a glass top stove.. I actually have two glass top stoves in my kitchen. I bake. a lot. so, two ovens are a necessity for me. that said... i use my glass top just like my other coil top or my old gas stove (which I hated) I can on it and I use cast iron on it. just be careful. don't slide your pans if you can at all avoid it. the other option is a stand alone hot plate type unit such as the one doghouse riley has only his is an induction and I don't believe you can put cast iron on an induction plate. get a regular coil one
     
  16. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    Oh yes dear any ferrous and thus magnetic pan works on those electromagnet coils they are selling as induction
     
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