Hostas Made In My Garden

Discussion in 'Member's Gallery' started by Droopy, Apr 30, 2022.

  1. Droopy

    Droopy Slug Slaughterer Plants Contributor

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    Warning - Bragging Alert - Enter Thread at Own Risk!



    Ok, you've been duly warned, so I'll get on with my story about my Hostas. MINE! My Precioussssssss.... Yup, that's how I feel about them.

    The first one is a sport of our "Stitch In Time" that we imported from the Netherlands in 2009. It's known to be fickle, not particularly hardy, and a slow grower. I planted it at a good spot and let it do its thing. It didn't grow much, but seemed to be fine. Then I noticed a new plant popping up by it. I first thought that "Stitch" had decided to spread out in an unusual way, and I was very happy. Then I had a closer look. It looked like a smallish Hosta, but very unlike "Stitch". Then one hard winter four years ago "Stitch" died, but the sport lived. I moved it to another part of the garden and kept a close watch over it. It turned out to be a small jewel, at least in my opinion. What Hosta-mother would I be if I didn't love my offs... eh... sports? And they popped up here, so I'm allowed to name them.

    Since it's small (about 20cm/8inches tall) and sweet I named it "Gabriella" after our small, white, sweet pony that was often more brown, grey, green, and yellow in summer. This is a slow grower, but not as slow as "Stitch". Here she is, Hosta "Gabriella":

    20190730_223930.jpg

    As you can see she comes out light green, turns yellow and then old parchment white. She hasn't managed to bloom yet, and I'm looking forward to when she does.

    Fransen Hostas in the Netherlands also has a sport of "Stitch" for sale. It looks very similar but has slightly differently shaped leaves.



    So, on to the next one. This Hosta is a cross between "Snowflakes" and "Blue Cadet". It decided to sprout in between some Sanguinaria so I didn't see it there for the first couple of years. Four years ago I needed to move that clump, and so I discovered the little one. Self-seeded Hostas are usually boring and get weeded away, but this one looked special so I took it aside and planted it where I could keep an eye on it. Because I thought it both sneaky and smart to hide in between the Sanguinaria I named it after my sneaky, smart, totally lovable, best ever pony friend Truls.

    Hosta "Truls" has inherited the greyish-green back of his blue parent's leaf, and the green, puckered front of "Snowflakes". The leaves are more bowl-shaped than any of the parents' leaves, and it grows pretty upright for a Hosta so both sides show. It's not totally stable in the foliage. Some leaves are flatter and less puckerd. The size is about 25-30 cm or 10-12 inches. It's a fast grower and takes after "Snowflakes" in how it spreads out, but not quite that vigorous. The blooms are a mix of both parents in both looks and colour.

    Here he is, Hosta "Truls":

    20180601_134026.jpg

    20200720_181936.jpg
     
    Jerry Sullivan, S-H, Sjoerd and 2 others like this.
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  3. eileen

    eileen Resident Taxonomist Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    I think Gabriella and Truls would be so proud to have Hostas named after them.
     
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  4. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Those are very nice-looking hostas. The Gabriella really does have the most interesting of foliage variation. Truls …. That flower is superb.

    Both those newbies are winners in their own rights. Mother Nature has worked her magic once again and given you the opportunity to memorialise your two ponies. It is a modern-day cliché….a win-win situation.

    Congrats.
     
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  5. Shawchert

    Shawchert In Flower

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    Nice!! I get to see what I can look forward to. I got some blue hastas and they are peeking out of the soil
     
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  6. Droopy

    Droopy Slug Slaughterer Plants Contributor

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    I think so too, @eileen.

    Yes, @Sjoerd, I feel like I'm a cheat since I didn't work to cross breed and all that, but I did buy the parent plants and took care of them. I simply lucked out I guess.

    @Shawchert, thanks! I counted Hostas last year, and there were 118 different ones growing in our garden. They have different foliage, and different sizes even though some of them are too similar to my liking and will probably be either traded or sold. The smallest is about 2 cm, or one inch, small. The biggest is the "Empress Wu".
     
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  7. Netty

    Netty Chaotic Gardener Plants Contributor

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    Wow Droopy, that is amazing! I'm going to have to start paying more attention to what I'm weeding out of my gardens!
     
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  8. Droopy

    Droopy Slug Slaughterer Plants Contributor

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    Thanks, @Netty, and please do! I've stayed my weeding hand a few times before. One of those saved by the bell is now a thriving, blue butterfly bush. One is a Ribes sanguineum. Other volunteers have either been placed with their parents, or traded for something else.
     
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