Is rainwater or springwater better for rooting cuttings?

Discussion in 'Gardening Other' started by Odif, May 21, 2017.

  1. Odif

    Odif Young Pine

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    Does anyone know whether rainwater or springwater is better for rooting cuttings? I guess tapwater is no good.
     
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  3. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    They say they are the best to root plants in because it has minerals in it for the plant to use. I think the real answer is that water softener water is not so good for rooting because it is stripped of all the minerals..
     
  4. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

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    I have no idea but I never try rooting in water. I always use a rooting hormone and a heat mat with some covers and I mist them several times a day or as needed.
     
    Last edited: May 21, 2017
  5. Odif

    Odif Young Pine

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    I usually root in soil. I have very little success trying to root in water. I suppose rainwater is good. Some plants they say to root in water. Someone told me to mix charcoal with the soil to aid rooting. I haven't tried this yet though.
     



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  6. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    I root cuttings in tap water if the plants to be rooted are not particularly important to me. I have rooted in rainwater and spring water also in the lottie. They do it oké and so I would opt for that for plants that are important to you.
    Like Carolyn, I sometimes use rooting hormone powder for plants that i am especially interesting in being successful.
    An interesting variation is the use of willow bark and and scrapings in the water where you are trying to root a cutting. A lot has been written about this. I have tried it and had success with this. This too has variations ---to use it in water after peeling the bark off and crushing it. Another technique involved scraping the layer just under the outer bark and placing that in the water... others actually boil the bark strips / shavings...or in some cases the whole twigs. It can be complicated, or should I say a busy chore. I was interested, so I reasarched it and tried it a few times. Nowadays I do not root things so often, so I just tend to plop a correctly taken cutting in a little pot after trimming off most of the leaves, plant it against the edge, water it generously then cover it with a plastic bag....and wait.

    I wrote a piece about my technique a few years ago. If you are interested, here is the link: http://www.gardenstew.com/threads/phlox-propagation-with-cuttings.16420/

    Success with your rooting, mate.
     
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  7. Odif

    Odif Young Pine

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    I tried some plants with mychoriza powder and some with rooting hormone and some just popping in my mouth and using a bit of spittle.. I will report if there are any differences in a repeatable experiment. I also want to try difficult plants with things like currants or willows in the same pot to see if that helps with rooting. The plastic bag is good, I never thought of that. I sometimes put the plants in a polytunnel, but sometimes the extreme heat here kills them once they start to grow.
     
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  8. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    I see what you mean about the extreme heat in a polytunnel. When I use my greenhouse, I really have to be on my toes and get those plantlets out of that milieu as soon as is feasible, for just that reason.
    I am always interested in experiments and outcomes, so I shall be looking forward to your results with great interest. I wish that I could come by mychoriza here.
     
  9. Odif

    Odif Young Pine

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    Sjoerd, these guys, gluckspilze.com sell mychoriza with europe wide or worldwide delivery the website is in german and english.
     
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  10. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    I use tap water to root most cuttings and have not had any problems transplanting them.
    I tried the rooting hormone route with some rose cuttings a few years ago and while it looked like they would be successful, they were a total failure, now when I cut back the Blaze Rose I just stick the cut end in a pot of soil and let it sit for a couple of years outside. They root like a charm and I have been able to plant two new ones in the back yard.
     
  11. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

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    I do not go to all the trouble with willow twigs. I just snip a few and crush the end with a hammer and put them in water with the cuttings I am rooting. Willow has the same characteristics as rooting hormone. It rarely fails for me.
     
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  12. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Thanks mate, I shall check that out.
     
  13. Odif

    Odif Young Pine

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    I have some michoriza. I will use them on my potatoes from seeds that i planted.
     
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  14. Odif

    Odif Young Pine

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    I often use a minitunnel and we have lots of broom and bracken. I shade my tunnel with these plants in the summer. This keeps the sun off the plants so they do not fry.
     
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  15. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    I have never heard of using michoriza when planting spuds. I will be interested to hear how your harvests will be after this.
     
  16. Odif

    Odif Young Pine

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    Commonly Utilized Plant Species That Benefit From mycorrhizae

    Acacia
    Agapanthus
    Alder
    Almond
    Apple
    Apricot
    Aspen
    Araucaria
    Artichoke
    Ash
    Asparagus
    Avocado
    Bamboo
    Banana
    Barley
    Basil
    Bayberry
    Bean
    Beech
    Begonia
    Black Locust
    Blackberry
    BlueGrama
    BoxElder
    Boxwood
    Brazilian Rubber
    Bulbs,all
    Burning Bush
    Cacao
    Cactus Camellia
    Carissa
    Carrot
    Cassava
    Ceanothus
    Cedar
    Celery
    Cherry
    Chinese Tallow
    Chrysanthemum
    Citrus, all
    Clover
    Coconut
    Coffee
    CoralTree
    Corn
    Cotton
    Cottonwood
    Cowpea
    Crab Tree
    Creosote Bush
    Cucumber
    Currant
    Cypress
    Dogwood
    Eggplant
    Eucalyptus
    Euonymus
    Fern
    Fescues Fig
    Flowers, almost all
    Forsythia
    Fuschia
    Gardenia
    Garlic
    Geranium
    Grapes,all
    Grasses, almost all
    Green Ash
    Guayule
    Gum
    Hemp
    Herbs, all
    Hibiscus
    Holly
    Hops
    Hostas
    Impatiens
    Jojoba
    Juniper
    Kiwi
    Leek
    Lettuce
    Ligustrum
    Lily
    Magnolia
    Mahonia
    Mango
    Maples, all Marigold
    Mellon, all
    Mesquite
    Millet
    Mimosa
    Morning Glory
    Mountain Laurel
    Nasturtium
    Okra
    Olive
    Olive Palm
    Onion
    Palms, all
    Papaya
    Passion Fruit
    Paw Paw
    Peach
    Peanut
    Pecan
    Peppers, all
    Pistachio
    Pittosporum
    Plum
    Podocarpus
    Poplar
    Poinsettia
    Potato
    Pumpkin
    Raspberry
    Redwood Rhaphiolepis
    Rice
    Rose
    Russian Olive
    Ryegrass
    Sagebrush
    Saltbush
    Sequoia
    Snapdragon
    Sourwood
    Soybean
    Squash
    Strawberry
    Succulents
    Sugar Cane
    Sumac
    Sunflower
    Sweet Gum
    Sweet Potato
    Sycamore
    Tea
    Tobacco
    Tomato
    Walnut
    Wheat
    Willow
    Yam
    Yew

    About 95% of plants benefit from mychoriza. To make Mychoriza more effective, a good bacterial soil life is helpful.
     

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