Lawn Edging

Discussion in 'Garden Design' started by Doghouse Riley, Jan 17, 2020.

  1. Doghouse Riley

    Doghouse Riley Young Pine

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    After mowing, this can be a pain.
    The problem is that unless you've straight edges (I don't like them), there's the chance of "border creep," where you gradually lose a bit of your lawn every time you edge the lawn.

    I overcame this problem ten years ago over a couple of days.

    Anyone could do it.

    Our main border slopes to the back and I've always had a channel between it and the lawn to give a "hard edge."
    I bought a quantity of small rectangular block paving bricks.
    I deepened the channel and laid some "small" hardcore.
    Then I laid some damp fine concrete mix on top to a depth of three inches and about six inches wide
    I worked the bricks part way into the mix, hard up against the edge of the lawn, using a straight edge "over the next one and the previous two" if you can understand me, to make sure they were level.
    It's best to keep stepping back and surveying your work.
    I let it go off overnight then made up some damp sand and cement mortar, but added a but of yellow dye to "soften" the look.
    I pointed up the bricks, then added more mortar to make a slope down from near the top of the bricks to the edge of the concrete for extra stability.

    The finished product, including rings of bricks around the three features, were a "bit in your face" to start.

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    But over a few months they settled down.

    Here I took the opportunity to get rid of the bits of York stone and tidy up the effect. As I made it smaller I had to add more grass, but it soon matched in.

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    Now mowing is much quicker I just pass my Flymo over the bricks. On the otherside of the lawn it meets the path on the same level. So I just angle my strimmer and run it down the "joint."

    I gave the small front garden the same treatment.

    After ten years I never give them much thought.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2021
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  3. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    So tidy looking. Love it. Unfortunately I will be pulling grass and weeds from my patio and paths as soon as it thaws. Neglect? Probably but my yard is just too big for me to get to all of it. Oh well, I really enjoy having greenery :stew1:
     
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  4. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    I enjoyed the tidbit about the use of colored masonry particularly, as the curves are never right for premade brick, even the type made for curves as the radius is just always not what I need.
     
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  5. Doghouse Riley

    Doghouse Riley Young Pine

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    That's why I chose these small square bricks, they lend themselves to curves, even quite tight ones.
     
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  6. Islandlife

    Islandlife Young Pine

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    When I had a lawn I had as much of it edged as I could so as to make weed eating or whipper snipping easy. Now my lawn is gravel. I still have it tall edged with Allen block but mowing is over and finished with.
     
  7. garden_newbie

    garden_newbie Seedling

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    Looks great. My last house had similar edging and after a years some bricks may become uneven so I had to readjust them.
     
  8. calebgilk

    calebgilk New Seed

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    I never thought I'd say this about lawns being the cause of the first fight between my husband and me. My family has always had artificial lawns, and our lawns were the place to rest. Artificial lawns are a time and effort saver. I got used to it. On the contrary, my husband has a cult of lawns. His parents can spend 4 hours after work in the garden, they love their flowers, their always perfectly mowed grass, my husband grew up in it. Now we have bought a house, and for 4 months we have been arguing about what kind of coverage we will have. I insist on artificial already found lawn that suits us. My husband disagrees and wants a natural garden. I don't know how to solve this problem.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2021
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  9. Tetters

    Tetters Seedling

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    I only just noticed your post @calebgilk - sorry. The thing is, you are asking this question on a forum where we are very much of the same mind as your husband. In your position however, and trying to see things from your point of view, maybe it would be best to allow your husband to grow his lawn, and his flowers and vegetables. It will be his effort and maybe just the hobby he needs. All you will have to do is sit around and enjoy the results.
    There is nothing as sweet as the smell of newly mown grass, and the perfume of flowers not to mention the taste of home grown food. You never know, you may even get an interest yourself. There is no progress without change :)
     
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