Not Par For The Course

Discussion in 'Fruit and Veg Gardening' started by Sjoerd, Nov 5, 2018.

  1. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    13,049
    Likes Received:
    5,251
    Normally we wait for the first frost to lift the parsnips. This year it is difficult to gauge, so we have now begun harvesting. The first half of the planted parsnips are out, washed and ready for processing. We will have some purée with our meal tomorrow evening.

    The weather is cold now and the garden is changing its appearance rapidly. We will leave the rest of the parsnips in the ground until we get a bit of frost or, if the weather warms-up...we will lift the rest then.

    Just have a look at these beauties:
    pasti2.jpg

    pasti3.jpg

    Don't they just make your mouth water? I am so proud of these...the length of the roots are so long ! I wonder if this has something to do with the extremely dry summer that we had. Another thing is the germination rate--it was almost 100%. The Bride had to thin them out for the first time ...evvuh. The result was definately not par for the course.

    Parsnips here are notoriously difficult to be successful with. For instance we usually plant two rows of two different types of parsnip, and then we are lucky if we get one half of one row row. I call those results "dismal".
    We have also tried to "pre-germinate" them by putting the seeds in wet paper towels and letting them sit for a few days...with and without heat under them. We have tried other techniques as well, but we still just have poor success rates, so you can perhaps imagine how elated I am this year. --yippee!!!
     
  2. Loading...


  3. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    8,504
    Likes Received:
    5,989
    Location:
    Central Texas, zone 8
    I'm so happy for you and yes, those are lovely parsnips. If I can appreciate parsnips, you really have a great crop!
     
    Sjoerd likes this.
  4. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    19,026
    Likes Received:
    4,276
    Location:
    North Central Texas, Zone 8a
    Congrats on such a wonderful harvest, they look great. Never acquired a taste for them myself but I am glad you will have them to enjoy through the winter.;)
     
    Sjoerd likes this.
  5. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Messages:
    1,185
    Likes Received:
    789
    They need a period of frost to change the starch in them into sugar so they become sweeter. However, if frost is not forthcoming then blanching and putting in the freezer has the same effect.
    We find if we leave them in the soil for too long they develop a hard core.
     
    hummerbum, Cayuga Morning and Sjoerd like this.



    Advertisement
  6. Gail-Steman

    Gail-Steman Young Pine

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Messages:
    1,825
    Likes Received:
    992
    Location:
    Staffordshire-UK Zone 4
    @Sjoerd great parsnips mate, good quality in size :setf_016:...they would have gone great in our stew last night :rofl:

    Don't mention the weather :setc_016:...I've got plants dying now for the winter and plants still flowering quite odd really but a lot of your ground as been cleared nicely :)
     
    Sjoerd likes this.
  7. eileen

    eileen Resident Taxonomist Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    27,354
    Likes Received:
    3,742
    Location:
    Scotland
    You must be so pleased to get a good crop at last. I've never grown parsnips as I've been told they are hard to raise. The weather obviously helped you along this year and the harvest you've got is something to be really proud of.
     
    Sjoerd likes this.
  8. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,470
    Likes Received:
    1,488
    Location:
    NE Texas
    I wanted to try them and planted some seed,,not a single one came up ! Guess they don`t like Texas weather ! How do you store them Sjoerd ?
     
    Sjoerd likes this.
  9. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    13,049
    Likes Received:
    5,251
    Thanks so much JANE. You make a good point that I take as complimentary. chuckle.

    TONI--Thank you. I really like them and use them several different ways.

    PALUSTRIS--You are so very right about the cores becoming hard. We have had that a couple of times in the past. That is something that costs lots of extra time when processing them.

    Ta GAIL--That weather is something else this year innit.

    EILEEN--You are too right about me being so pleased...chuffed to bits! Do you know, we actually have too much!? hahaha--never satisfied. You are also correct about them being difficult to raise...well actually the difficulty is with the germination (Mart's posting just below is a perfect example of what I am talking about), once they have germinated, then they're off and do the rest themselves until harvesting time.

    Oh no MART--That is sad news, but so typical of the awkward parsnip. I actually do not know how well they would grow in your climate there, but I do hope that you try again. Sometimes you have to germinate the seeds inside your home and then plant them out later. I can imagine that you may need to water and mulch them more frequently than I do here in our cool and moist climate.
    Are parsnips for sale in your supermarkets there? One almost never sees them here in the supermarket. It is what we call, "a forgotten vegetable".
    You asked how I store them: I blanch them and freeze them in. If you would like to store them though you could use a clamp (
    http://www.gardenstew.com/threads/making-a-clamp.12230/ ) or keep them in sand or a bed of straw in your cellar.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2018
  10. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Messages:
    1,185
    Likes Received:
    789
    Taste good when roasted, but they also are very good when boiled, and creamed like mashed potatoes. We like a spicy Parsnip soup too. Also pleasant raw and grated for a winter salad.
     
    Sjoerd likes this.
  11. Gail-Steman

    Gail-Steman Young Pine

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Messages:
    1,825
    Likes Received:
    992
    Location:
    Staffordshire-UK Zone 4
    Hi Sjoerd I hope your keeping well :)….don't mention it mate, the front garden is plastered in leaves...i'll need a totally new back after the weekend, until more drop :frustrated:
     
    hummerbum and Sjoerd like this.
  12. SamIAm

    SamIAm New Seed

    Joined:
    May 1, 2017
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    12
    Those are beautiful. The hardest part about parsnips is getting them to germinate. The seeds don't like to be covered and yet they take ~3 weeks to come up. It helps to have automatic watering that can keep the seeds moist. After they they are pretty trouble free. At least in my experience.

    Try parsnip fritters someday. Lots of recipes on the web. You won;t be sorry.
     
    Gail-Steman and Cayuga Morning like this.
  13. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Hardy Maple Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2011
    Messages:
    4,255
    Likes Received:
    2,249
    Location:
    New England
    What a beautiful harvest, SJ!
     
    Gail-Steman and Sjoerd like this.
  14. hummerbum

    hummerbum In Flower

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2011
    Messages:
    876
    Likes Received:
    823
    Location:
    Savannah GA
    Sjoerd, those make a person want to try and grow them!!! Congrats and amazing job!!! Those are beautiful and yes, you should overjoyed about those babies...heck I am
     
    Gail-Steman and Sjoerd like this.
  15. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2006
    Messages:
    1,185
    Likes Received:
    789
    If you have trouble getting the seeds to germinate in the soil, you can do it on coffee filter paper and then sow the growing seeds afterwards. The other trick is to take out the drill where you are going to sow them and then cover the base of it with damp peat or leaf mould and sow the seeds in that.
     
    Gail-Steman and Sjoerd like this.
  16. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    13,049
    Likes Received:
    5,251
    Glad you guys liked the thread. There are lots of tips on this thread for those of you who have not yet tried parsnips.
     
    Gail-Steman likes this.

Share This Page