Seeds Sprouted.. now what??

Discussion in 'Seed Starting / Propagation' started by StarLiteFarms, Mar 19, 2008.

  1. StarLiteFarms

    StarLiteFarms Seedling

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    My seeds are starting to sprout (most of them as you can see from my blog) But, they are thin and whispy especially the Tomato and tomotillos. They're about 2-3 inches tall aready and leaning over. Do i tie them to sticks yet? Do i already transplant them? Ive uncovered the containers that they are in now so they can grow taller. Could you give me your thoughts? They arent in very deep soil (egg cartons and small plastic containers from walmart pastry section (;

    Thanks so much!!!
     
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  3. trudy

    trudy In Flower

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    If they have there first set of true leaves then I would transplant them into deeper pots/containers. At there tender stage I wouldn't put them in direct sun all at one time but would slowly introduce them to the direct sun, say over a couple days of so. Once they get settled into there new pots an perked back up (they will most likely wilt once transplanted) after at least a week I would give them a weak fertilizer solution. I use fish emulsion at the rate of 1 oz per gallon of water the first time. I will increase this every week til time to plant into the garden. I wouldn't bother staking them at this stage, they are to tender an easily broken. This is the way I do it, someone else may have a better way.
     
  4. StarLiteFarms

    StarLiteFarms Seedling

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    Thanks Trudy. My lil green house is sitting right next to a south window so during the day the whole little green house is in direct sunlight for a couple of hours. The light i have for it is just a plain low watt barely heats it up but just doesnt let it get cold light bulb. Just something I rigged up. Ive got the issues about transplanting at this early stage as I was not expecting them to get growing so fast! Lol I will have to go searching for bigger pots!! OMG. I am not sure what you mean 'first set of TRUE leaves'.. all i see is each plant that has sprouted (most of them) have 2 little baby leaves at the very top. Is this what you are talkinga bout? (There's pics in my blog of them.)

    The potting soil is amended with nutrients already. Do i still need to add more? Like miricle grow?
    Thanks once again!!
     
  5. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    The first baby leaves are not true leaves, the plant will continue to grow and put out a nice set of true leaves and the first leaves will die off.
    Only fertilize the seedlings after the true leaves have come out and put on some growth and then only a very weak solution.

    You need to find a grow light bulb for them too, a regular lightbulb does not provide the full spectrum that plants need for healthy growth. Also, since some seeds need dark to germinate it is best to not turn the light on until the all the seedlings have broken the surface...and you might want to put them on a heating pad or some source where they can be heated from the bottom. If you have some seeds that haven't come up, you might want to replant them leaving them in the dark to see if that is what they need for germination.

    You mentioned in your blog that you have planted Lilac seeds but they haven't germinated yet,
    Lilac seeds can take as long as 60 days to germinate, if they germinate at all. They do need several weeks of Mother Natures stratification process before they can germinate too. You can provide that for them by planting the seeds in a pot, water really well, put the pot in a zip lock bag and sticking it in the fridge for a couple of months. Then move it under the grow light.

    Did you buy seeds or take them from another plant? Most Lilacs are hybrids which means the plant that comes from the seeds will not be like the original plant.

    Good luck with them.
     
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  6. StarLiteFarms

    StarLiteFarms Seedling

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    Ok, then, only one plant (squash) has one true leaf growing so far. The rest are just baby leaves. Ill try to get a grow light soon. budgets are tight so i gotta improvise if possible. :)

    The lilac seeds came from my moms lilac plant that she dug up from a relative a couple of years ago. I just thru them in just to see if i could do anything with them. Thanks for the input! :)
     
  7. weeds n seeds

    weeds n seeds Seedling

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    To save money as far as containers for transplanting go, try using 8 ounce (or larger) styrofoam cups that can be gotten at discount stores for a minimum price. Punch 5 holes in bottoms for good drainage, write what's in each one right on the cup with a Magic Marker as you go along. The cups "breathe", help with a better formation of seedlings' roots. Also, dampening the potting soil to be used for transplants with liquid kelp, or a root booster, will definately help to stop "transplant shock" and put the seedlings on the right track. Just follow directions on bottles as to how much..per gallon of water..to use for transplanting.
     
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  8. Penny

    Penny Young Pine

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    Great idea for the styrofoam cups, i need to do that.
     
  9. petunia

    petunia Young Pine

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    I have used the styrofoam cups this year. So far it has been working nicely. I have red, yellow hollyhock up, also coleus, impatients, herb-basil, cosmos, magnolia trees started, many plants I have started inside already and are doing well by a sunny window.
     
  10. CritterPainter

    CritterPainter Awed by Nature

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    I save up my little yoghurt cups for transplanting and such. Good size for that. I actually reuse them a few times before they become brittle. Just knock a drain hole in 'em. And if you have curbside recycling, a quick rinse and they go right in.
     
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  11. Netty

    Netty Chaotic Gardener Plants Contributor

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    I use those yogurt cups too as well as the pudding containers the kids take in their lunch.
     

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