Strawb Is As Strawb Does

Discussion in 'Fruit and Veg Gardening' started by Sjoerd, Jul 10, 2019.

  1. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Well, we've gone through two rows of strawbs now and are working on the last two rows (a later variety) of Malvina's. This type is new for us this year.
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    These Malvina's look great and smell great...and taste pretty good. Having said that, we found their flesh a bit stiff, almost hard, and the flavour was good, but not enough to make me swoon. By far, the best attribute is that they are a late cropper. The season has been extended for us.

    The Dar Royale's and the Korona's are finished and out of the ground. The ground will be planted with a "green manure crop" and some winter leeks..
    zzzb.jpg

    BTW--do you see those surviving B. Sprout plants back behind the empty bed? They were transplanted three days ago. It goes against all convention, but they are standing tall and have only lost their lower leaves. It's raining today...I have every reason to believe that they will make it. If they do, it will be a small miracle, as well as a lesson learned for me--You don't always have to follow the rules.

    Right then--the reason for this thread is not to discuss the strawb choices or brassica planting violations, it is to present an oddity:
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    I have never seen this blooming on a strawb. I am guessing that the scientific process is called "viviparous germination". I have seen something similar in toms and bell peppers...but never to the extent that a germinated seed was actually blooming.

    Strawbs are one of the most unusual fruit/veg around--I mean to say, the seeds are on the outside of the "fruit"...at any rate, they are not inside the sweet, red portion of the structure that we call a "strawberry". When you read about strawbs, you learn that what looks like the seeds on the outside of the red (or sometimes white) fruit, are actually the fruits and the seeds are inside the seed-looking structures. What a wondrous thing nature is.

    Next month we will have to get some replacements for all these strawbs and find a new place to make the two-year beds. We replace our plants every two years now.
     
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  3. Growingpains

    Growingpains Young Pine

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    Sjoerd, my first thought was the tomato I opened years ago and found gobs of tiny leaves. However, I have never seen a flower growing out of the strawberry. If the taste isn't as you like, perhaps use them for jam?
    I'm so thankful for your rain. I watered a lot last evening, praying for rain as I perspired gallons.
    Re: transplanted beans, gardening is an ever-learning experience.
     
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  4. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    Fascinating strawberry. Others in the family are fans of growing them. They even weeded the hula strawberries (the berries are the size of a pinkie fingernail, with a taste of pineapple). We had some old everbearing strawberries survive the weeds, but compared to raspberries and blueberries I have difficulty seeing the value of using the space for such a small crop of fruit. Of course slug damage, and occasional presence in the fruit, colors my attitude also. I am certain i have never had the joy of your flavorful strawberries. Or it could be that others have eaten them all, before I’ve seen them?

    With two more adults joining in harvesting and eating berries this year I will certainly have to plant more. Berries are our most favored crops. Today I got to taste our first golden everbearing raspberry. It was truly golden in flavor and looks. I still haven’t gotten to taste a fully ripe boysenberry though. Some adults like to pick fruit before it is fully ripe. The same for the blueberries. I have had to freeze blueberries with more pink than sweet. They are driving me crazy picking berries before they are ripe, but I say nothing. (Maybe I should plant some pink blueberries?) I did mention once that blueberries are sweeter when they roll off when you touch them and should be blue. They didn’t seem to understand. No real complaints though (just craziness). After all, they are picking and eating, but if they only knew how good they could taste....

    Sorry for the berry rant.
     
  5. Growingpains

    Growingpains Young Pine

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    Jewell, my sentiments exactly. BLUE berries!
     
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  6. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    GP-- I did jam that strawb and the last of the harvest as well. Nature is a strange thing isn't it. That tom you operned up to find lots of growth--what a wonder ot all is.

    Never mind the berry rant, JEWELL--I like listening to rants, as sometimes they contain interesting facts or tips. It isd helpful to me as a gardener to hear what oitrhgers like or dislike and things that go onm where they garden. Thanks for your responce.
    We are noticing our blues blueing in their white tents. I am getting excited.
     

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