Strawberry planter confusion

Discussion in 'Fruit and Veg Gardening' started by fish_4_all, Mar 4, 2010.

  1. fish_4_all

    fish_4_all In Flower

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    636
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    Zone 8-9 Washington
    [​IMG]
    I like this one. Sorry, it is only 35 inches tall and 36 wide from point to point or there abouts, NOT 8' tall and 6 feet wide. I have the plans if anyone wants them.
    I have seen more basic ones with pyramids stacked and simle boxes stacked on each other.
    [​IMG]

    Is one really better than the others? How much room does each plant need to thrive and produce lots of fruit? I am planting Quinalts if that helps.


    The top one is smaller than I thought, I edited the caption to show the actual size.

    I am concerned about using Ceder though as I know it has antibacterial properties. I hope using it won't hinder the breakdown of mulches, compost and other things put in there for the plants.

    I do like that idea though MuddyKnees. I have a couple 40 gallon water barrels that would really make for lots of holes to put strawberries in. As for the water aspect, I don't think it will be a problem here accept for maybe a month a year if that. Stays a lot cooler here. But the pipes is a good idea for whatever I decide to do.
     
  2. Loading...


  3. MuddyKnees

    MuddyKnees New Seed

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Near Melbourne, Australia
    I'd be a bit concerned about timber construction from a long term aspect. Strawberries need a lot of water but that's not so good for timber. I have a large plastic barrel with 3" holes cut all around it (staggered and spaced about 12" from each other. ) In all about 20 plants. Then some plastic pipes, drilled all over with holes for watering) placed vertically at different levels to get water down . works Ok..will outlast me, I reckon.. but in our hot, dry summers it's a frequent watering chore all season. I think any of those pictured will soon become overcrowded unless you plant less than the photos show. Anyway, any will work just fine..
     
  4. daisybeans

    daisybeans Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2009
    Messages:
    3,695
    Likes Received:
    77
    Location:
    annapolis md
    I wonder if you could build any of these using that recycled plastic decking material -- like Trex or timber Tech? I like these designs. I'm not doing strawberries this year, but if I were, I'd think about these.
     
  5. whistler

    whistler Seedling

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2007
    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    British Columbia
    A lot depends on the lumber. Some might last a couple of years to 5 years before rotting. I'd be concerned over the pyramid one for watering. Gravity pulls the water down and possibly the soil for the upper ones too, so they'll dry out faster. Strawberries take a lot of water daily which the wood used to construct it might not stand up to.
     



    Advertisement
  6. fish_4_all

    fish_4_all In Flower

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    636
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    Zone 8-9 Washington
    I have to agree with the pyramid problems. I am thinking now that a simple box on box approach will be better. More soil for each plant and easier to move and store if needed.

    Thinking 6-12" wide, 6" deep and 24" long would be good for 4 plants and with 6-8 boxes I should have a bunch of berries to pick and have my kids and wife eat all summer long.

    Any suggestions on the size of each box and how many plants to put in each for that size?
     
  7. Biita

    Biita Arctic-ally Challenged Forager

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    2,048
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Norway
    Hi Fish 4 all.
    The triangle pyramid one i own 3 of them in all different sizes. Altho i do not have them here where i live now, they are in the arctic. I had strawberries planted right outside my door in the smaller of the 3. The others i had herbs in one, and ediable flowers in the other. I had got them right before we moved south. My friend is the maker, owner and copyright on that design, and he showed me how to get the most out if it.

    First it is a stackable build. But inter locking thru the center. The idea behind this build is there is less watering because it is watered at the top and flows down. The dirt that is not exposed to light keeps the water in longer and stays moist even in very dry conditions. It is also designed when placed out in the open, all 3 sides will recieve light all day long,,not just one side. Also you get more planting space in the design than the typical flat box build, even with stacking.

    I have asked how my triangles have done so far,,and my friend Inger, said the one with the herbs is already starting to show life. The strawberries are green already, and the last one she can not tell yet. And that is in the Arctic! They are covered with plastic, and herbs can be grown out in the outdoors in sub zero weather with no heater, as long as you stop watering them by novermber and not start again until the days are warmer. Just take the plastic off and there you have it. all planted and ready to go. You will have to replace the soil or add more after 2-3 yrs. I had worms in mine, and always made sure i had someting in there for them to eat.

    So its just a thought, and that is the one i do know about. Hope you have fun making your planters!

    ohh yes i forgot,,the strawberries i had planted,,i had over 40 plants in it,,and that was just 3 tiers and the top little one. So lots of room in those planters.
     
  8. fish_4_all

    fish_4_all In Flower

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    636
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    Zone 8-9 Washington
    I may build one this spring but for now I am going with the boxes just because it is what I have. The pyramid was gonna cost me a LOT to get just the cedar boards for the support boards to the top.

    I would love to see plans for the pyramid planter with the stackable sections because that is really what I want and need. This would allow me to take it down completely if needed for a move or to redo the soil and not have a huge planter to try and handle.

    You are talking about the one in the second picture in the top right correct? I like that one and owuld allow for a lot of herbs in the top 2 or 3 tiers and tons of berries in the lower ones.

    If your friend will tell you can you find out what type of wood he recommends?
     
  9. Biita

    Biita Arctic-ally Challenged Forager

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Messages:
    2,048
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Norway
    Hi Fish,,the wood that is used is called Siberia Density. It does not rot in water, is very strong and it also breaths, or lets air circulation thru. The plans i am sorry, but that is his patent and can not do. But it is a very simple build. The Siberia wood is a 100 times better than cedar, but i do not know if you can get it where you live.

    Good luck and hope it all turns out well for you!! I am sure it will.
     
  10. fish_4_all

    fish_4_all In Flower

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    636
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    Zone 8-9 Washington
    Have never heard of Siberia Density but sounds like white cedar. Much better than red cedar for breathing and such.

    I found a lot of plans for the same thing but I have no intention of ever selling a patented item. I hate cheap knock offs on patented items. I have seen 2 versions of it in stores but not of anything of quality.

    The information was more important to me. The watering issue and especially water logged bottom sections was worrysome on everythinig I saw that had soil all the way through it from it different levels. With the design of the pyramid it seems that issue is taken care of with a lot more surface area that the 4 sided one with the slanted shelves.

    I may just have to build both sooner or later and see which one works better made out of cedar.
     

Share This Page