How do I propagate Buxus (boxwood)?

Discussion in 'Seed Starting / Propagation' started by Droopy, Mar 7, 2008.

  1. Droopy

    Droopy Slug Slaughterer Plants Contributor

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    Can somebody please tell me how to correctly propagate a Buxus bush? I've had beginner's luck with it, but can't remember when or how really, and need a proper description of the process. When to do it, how best to do it and where would be nice. Please?

    When we moved in, we found a small Buxus in the garden. We moved it to a better place, and it's doing well. I've always dreamed of a Buxus hedge around the herbs and spices patch, and want to start it from small cuttings because we can trim the hedge to our liking then.

    About three years ago I cut some branches off the Buxus, and thought I'd try propagating. I tore off some little twigs, and just stuck them in the ground between some iris and paeonies in a place that's normally damp. Amazingly enough, most of them put out roots, and I transplanted them last year. I now have the beginning of the hedge. But I need more.

    I'm eagerly awaiting advice. :)
     



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  2. SongofJoy57

    SongofJoy57 In Flower

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    Here ia what I found, and there is a lot of interesting stuff on this link.

    http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/envirohort/4 ... 6-603.html

    Propagation
    Boxwood is normally propagated from cuttings, although propagation from seed is possible. In fact, garden enthusiasts find that growing boxwood from seed is interesting because the seedlings produced have variations. The form might be upright, weeping, globe, or dwarf; and the texture of the foliage may be fine to coarse. Ability to withstand winter conditions also varies with seedling boxwood.
    When boxwood is grown from cuttings, it will be identical to the parent plant. An easy method of cutting propagation is to place cuttings (about 4 to 6 inches long) in sand or sandy soil during summer months; keep the area moist (an outdoor mist system would be helpful); protect from direct sunlight and wind. After a good root system develops, transplant to a row in the garden. Partial shade is beneficial until the plant becomes established in the field. This shade could be provided by a section of snow fence.
    Propagating in a plastic chamber is also a simple and inexpensive method. For this method, use a flat or container, rooting medium, and a plastic cover.

    My granny had boxwoods in her yard . . . when I smell them, it reminds me of playing in her shaded yard.
     
  3. Droopy

    Droopy Slug Slaughterer Plants Contributor

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    Good one, SoJ, thank you. I searched around but couldn't find a site that told me in easy-to-understand terms what I should do.

    I've never seen flowers on the thing, let alone seed. Maybe we're too far north for them to mature?

    I've got a perpetually damp patch that's partly in shade, so I'll add lots of sand and try cuttings there come summer.
     
  4. wood_fern

    wood_fern New Seed

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    I'm rearranging some my boxwoods in a new entryway plan. Ran across an interesting 8 page article showing how boxwood and hydrangea can be used together in a hedges/borders. Might be of interest to you. It's in current issue of Garden Ideas (spring 2008). Good luck with propagation.
     
  5. Droopy

    Droopy Slug Slaughterer Plants Contributor

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    That sounds very interesting wood fern. I'm afraid I haven't seen Garden Ideas here in Norway. My boxwood hedge is going to be fairly low, about a foot or so, to protect the herbs from the cold winds, so I can't mix hydrangea with it.
     

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