Advice for an Oakleaf Hydrangea

Discussion in 'Hydrangea' started by Kay, May 10, 2012.

  1. Kay

    Kay Girl with Green Thumbs

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    Well, the planting season has begun in my landscaping job, and with that always comes the orphans. I adopt frequently during this time. This week we had to remove 3 Oakleaf Hydrangeas to make room for other plants. I hate it when we have to do it. The plants were fine... so of course, I looked them over carefully and chose the one I liked best as far as shape and size. It was carefully dug out, placed in a nursery pot with soil and mulch, watered and set in the shade. It had to wait about 36 hours (but who's counting?) Today, I snuck home at lunch and planted it. You can see by the photo that it is drooping. I think it is better if these are transplanted in their dormancy, but that didn't happen. My question is: does anybody have any experience moving one of these? Do you think it will snap out of it? I had to prune off a couple branches that were damaged, but should I prune it more?

    [​IMG]
    ( photo / image / picture from Kay's Garden )

    I guess it won't break my heart if it doesn't make it, but it's fun to give it a try.
     
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  3. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    I don't know for sure but I have read that when transplanting a non-dormant plant you should cut the foliage back. That way the plant can expend it's energy getting the roots settled into the new spot without having to worry about supporting the above ground growth.
    You would probably sacrifice blooms this year but it should be very strong and ready to burst out in blooms next year.
     
  4. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

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    Kay, I was going to suggest cutting back the foliage also and cover it to keep the wind and sun light off it. Misting with water may help also.
     
  5. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    I have done some things like that and even if the top doesn't do well the roots will survive by next Spring. Made sure it doesn't get over heated or too dry this Summer. Water it often when needed.

    Barb in Pa. :-D
     



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  6. Mallotum

    Mallotum New Seed

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    As othres have suggested keep it watered. It may drop some of the leaves itself, but dont be alarmed.
     
  7. Kay

    Kay Girl with Green Thumbs

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    I really appreciate the advice. Gave me the encouragement to prune. I went out when I got home from work and cut it back by about half.Then gave it a long drink, and spread mulch. Carolyn, when you say to cover it, what would you use? It will be getting some sun in the morning, and then again in the afternoon.
     
  8. Kay

    Kay Girl with Green Thumbs

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    Almost a week has passed, and I am cautiously optimistic! The pruning really seemed to help, the plant looks so much perkier now. I'm excited! This will be my plant to fuss over for a while.
     

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