Bad Trees?

Discussion in 'Trees, Shrubs and Roses' started by Dirtmechanic, Aug 16, 2022.

  1. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    Does he have a security doll of you? I mean just to hold for comfort whilst being sheared?

    Well the Elvira dolls are not the best example maybe.
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2022
  2. Tetters

    Tetters Young Pine

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    Afraid I can't translate your language mate, I wish you lot would learn how to speak English......especially you.
     
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  3. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    Haha just poking you! Remember we are the rabble that left the isle of eden!
     
  4. mart

    mart Strong Ash

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    Ha !! Glad he doesn`t have to translate Texas English !
     



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  5. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

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    I agree they didn't list favored replacements. There are some good choices. Plus, they painted with too broad a brush. What about the places where those trees are native, for example?

    I have a beautiful, mature ginkgo tree that I grew from a seed. Fortunately, it's male. I have others that are not mature, so I don't know. I have an aspen tree, fortunately not near any drainage pipes. Quite beautiful.

    There are many species of birch. Some are better than others. Ditto for eucalyptus.

    I do not like Leyland cypress. They are crazy popular here, not good in wildfire country. Time will tell.

    I have red oak, ginkgo, river birch, alpine eucalyptus (not the blue gum, also called "gasoline bomb tree").

    Over time, I've planted multiple Tilia cordata lindens (for bees, but they are lovely trees), various types of maples (not silver maple), ginkgos, oaks, birches (river birch and a weeping burch), mountain ash, persimmon, an Illinois mulberry (delicious berries, compact tree) and several windmill palms. I also planted a monkey puzzle, a madrone, and an American linden that did not survive. I planted a sourwood that died but now has come up again from the roots.

    Living here, the biggest issue is what will cause dangerous, spreading wildfires and endanger houses and people. Being semi-rural, Pacific Northwest, there are LOTS of evergreens (firs, spruces, pines). During dry summers (the past several), they dry out quickly, but retain flammable oils, and become fire-bombs. (So does blue gum eucalyptus, remember the Oakland fire), I think most deciduous trees would be better choices. Various maples, lindens, oaks, Pacific dogwood, American persimmon, horse chestnut, real (not American) chestnut (and productive too, but such spiny hulls! asian chestnut is less disease susceptible), ginkgo, liquidamber (if you don't mind those spiny seed hulls), come to mind. For smaller trees, I think dogwoods are nice, also windmill palm, flowering cherry and plum.

    I also grew a dawn redwood that I'm proud of. Probably not a choice for a small yard, and the same is true for some of the others.

    I think Zelkovas are nice but have never grown one.
     
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  6. Pacnorwest

    Pacnorwest Hardy Maple

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    I agree to a certain extent. They are the first trees to bloom every spring but a hassle to trim and clean up .
    Got buds…’Stella Mags. 5 of them…
     
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