Bokashi Bin Journey and Random Thoughts

Discussion in 'Organic Gardening' started by Jewell, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    I have discovered a new to me method of composting, bokashi. http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2012/jan/27/bokashi-bin-compost-alys-fowler?newsfeed=true. It works more on a pickling process that happens in the first weeks. I found a couple of blogs with more info about using a bottomless tub with an air-tight lid and bran starter. It sounds like something I can use easily that doesn't encourage wildlife (a major concern). Has anyone else used this method? Any thoughts?

    I decided to use this post to continue my explorations into composting methods and any bird walks that may lead me down. Please share your thoughts or discoveries.
     
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  3. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Well Jewell, I have not tried this method specifically, but have tried working with (EM) Effective Micro-organisms. Here is a link: http://www.volkstuindersvereniginghoorn ... age18.html

    There was a website where one could ask for and receive a free amount of starter materials. I took advantage of that to run my own experiments.

    I used this method for three years and thought that I noticed some slight improvements. I believed that the root balls of the plantlets that I was raising (before planting them out), I thought that I noticed an improvement in the foliage and when I used it in my compost bin, it seemed to speed up the composting.

    The Bokashi idea is related, but not exactly the same. I shall be interested in hearing your experiences with this, should you decide to try it.
     
  4. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Hardy Maple Plants Contributor

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    Jewell--This looks intriguing.
     
  5. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    Sjoerd, the Effective-Micro-organisms (EM) sounds somewhat similar to the bokashi. Bokashi ferments (in house) the waste as part of the initial decomposition. Both sound kind of like making or using a starter like when making sourdough. After reading up from multiple sites it appears like I will be able to compost a few more household waste products. Most household waste now goes to the municipal green bin for recycling to discourage city wildlife. Lol The city even has provided the indoor kitchen bin.

    I have some new garden space that will perfect for this venture.
     



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  6. KK Ng

    KK Ng Hardy Maple

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    Jewell, when you said "I will be able to compost a few more household waste products", does this means animal and fish proteins? Now I only make use of non animals and fish waste in order to keep the varmints and city wildlife away but recently I thought of bringing my compost skill to the next level by adding fish waste.
     
  7. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    KK, according to the blogs and threads I have been reading you can recycle meat, fish skin, dog poo, cheese, milk and the kinds of proteins I usually don't compost on site.. You can make the inoculate or buy a special bran inoculated with the good bacteria. The waste ferments or is pickled in an air tight container. Two containers are used.

    We already have one indoor waste bucket, so I need to set up the fermentation bucket (temperature needs to be 70 F or higher) and find its lid. The fermentation process needs only 2 weeks for the full fermentation bucket. This process really speeds up the decomposition of wastes. YouTube had some explanation videos, and here is a blog on the subject from someone who has been using it for a while with container gardening. http://bokashiworld.wordpress.com/page/2/

    I found a real interesting thread where several people all made their own inoculate and compared notes along the way. http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/fo...extreme-bokashi-make-your-own-innoculant.html.

    Although the bran is kind of pricey I think I will start with it. If it really works well for me and critters don't like the pickled proteins after I plant it in the garden I'll be attempting to make the inoculate.

    We have some very persistent critters. One year I used bone meal for bulbs covered with six inches of soil and my yard/bulbs got dug up. If the animals don't go for the fermented meat/bone scraps then it will be worth the attempt. I will also be interested to see if it works/ferments weeds and weed seeds that I don't compost on site since my piles are not hot enough to kill them.
     
  8. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Hardy Maple Plants Contributor

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    Hi Jewell,

    So you intend to start the fermentation process indoors, then shift the fermented product outside? Do you have any idea how heavy this will be? Are we talking a small bucket?
     
  9. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    CM, As I understand it you can use the size bucket you want layering the bran and refuge so it doesn't smell. The 2nd bucket and fermenting needs to be air tight. I will be using a 2 1/2 or 5 gallon bucket that I have on hand. They do have buckets with spigots to easily control moisture you can buy but they are cost prohibitive for me. Should be getting a bucket started in the next few weeks and see what my experiences are.. Am ordering the bran today.
     
  10. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Good luck with your venture, Jewell. I think that you will enjoy the exercise, and I hope that you get some good results. Please do post more as you progress.
     
  11. KK Ng

    KK Ng Hardy Maple

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    Thanks Jewell, I will keep this in mind because I can only start after I settled into the new place ... hope I can remember!!! I am not able to get into the link about making the inoculate. Anyway I think most of the items would not be available here in this part of the world so I have to improvise a lot. For the starter, I was thinking of making use of yogurt.
     
  12. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    I have decided to continue this thread as I experiment with bokashi. I will also be including any interesting articles that I find on the web. As I have started this journey I have been stumbling on different thoughts, actions that have sparked my interest. Would love to hear your thoughts on any of them. If you find anything that relates I would love for you to share.

    Having more money than sense I decided to order a bucket and bran. I have found that you can use two of the five gallon plastic food buckets successfully. Drill holes in one for the strainer, food layering and set it into the other for liquid drips. The inoculate I am still looking at, so using the bran is a quick jump into this process for me.

    [​IMG]
    New bokashi bucket ( photo / image / picture from Jewell's Garden )

    When the package arrived one of my little dogs was very interested in the bran. The smell she found intriguing. Made me a little worried if critters will be attracted, but time will tell.

    My first layer to go into my new bin are chicken bones from three roasters that I had saved and frozen. This morning I sprinkled on the bran and the trip begins

    [​IMG]
    First food waste and bran layer ( photo / image / picture from Jewell's Garden )
     
  13. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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  14. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Hardy Maple Plants Contributor

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    Jewell---Interesting article about fertilizer. I have subscribed to her blog now. I have also read that this organic "fertilizer" can be a deterrent to critters, much the way coyote "fertilizer" can be.

    I am enjoying following your thread about your bokashi bin!
     
  15. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

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    This is interesting... I'll be following along too!
     
  16. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    Had to empty the counter food scrap container into the bokashi container this morning. Unlike the counter container the bokashi had no noticeable smell even though it was filled with chicken scraps. The white mold that is part of the fermentation process had already formed in the bokashi container. So far it is easier than keeping the counter scrap bucket.

    Our dishwasher failed a couple of months ago. At first we were going to replace it right away, but after we had started doing dishes the old fashioned way we weren't so sure we wanted to. My husband and I are now discussing replacing it with a cabinet instead of a new dishwasher. Having been here 30+ years we aren't worried about resell values. I think I will plan for bokashi bucket storage in the new cabinet.
     

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