Building Fountain using Water Well Pump-COMPLETED!

Discussion in 'Water Gardening' started by cherylad, Aug 9, 2011.

  1. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

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    About a month ago, I started gathering the information I needed for this project.
    Here's the link to that post.


    http://www.gardenstew.com/about22870.html

    While doing my online research, I didn't find a whole bunch of instructions. I did get wonderful tips and information from right here! So, thanks again!
    So, if you all don't mind, I'd like to chronicle my progress here. Who knows, maybe it could help someone one day?


    We got the old pump head from my uncle's old workshop.

    [​IMG]
    old well pump ( photo / image / picture from cherylad's Garden )


    For the reservoir, I got a 100% recycled LDPE flexible plastic 40 gallon tank. It is 27 inches wide, 40 inches long and 13 inches high. It was $30 at the farm/ranch supply store.

    [​IMG]
    proposed tub ( photo / image / picture from cherylad's Garden )


    I had originally wanted to use a solar powered pump but it proved to be too costly and too much work. So I went with an electric one. It is a 130-170 GPH Fountain Pump w/auto shutoff . Maximum lift is 49 inches. Required 1/2 inch inside diameter tubing. The pump was around $40 and the clear vinyl tubing was just a couple of dollars (for four feet)

    I needed some one inch diameter piping. My design required a 3-foot and a 1-foot piece. Also needed a "tee", reducer (from one inch to 1/2 inch), and an end cap.
    The store didn't have a one-foot piece. So I had to buy a 5-foot section and they cut it to the lengths I needed (I have a 1-foot left-over piece). They even threaded them for me. Great, I thought. Come to find out they didn't do a very good job, and my brother had to work on the threads to get them to work. Sure glad I asked him to come and help! The piping and fittings costs around $25. My brother, on the other hand, cost a 6-pack of his favorite beer and a steak dinner!
    :)


    He dug a hole about 2 foot deep. Placed the 3-foot pipe in it. While I held it in place, he packed dirt around it about half way up, then filled the rest with concrete mix, and then topped it off with just a bit more dirt.

    (I asked him why didn't he wet down the concrete. He said it was trick he had learned from our dad when they built fences. He said the concrete would drawn in enough moisture from the ground eventually. But this method would save time. No waiting overnight for the concrete to set up. You could attach your fencing right away since the post was already super sturdy.)

    Anyhow, he then attached the "tee" with the reducer and this other fitting (sorry, I don't know what it's called) where the tubing would attach.

    [​IMG]
    connection ( photo / image / picture from cherylad's Garden )





    [​IMG]
    tube connected ( photo / image / picture from cherylad's Garden )

    (I think I will put a hose clamp on it to make sure the tubing doesn't get knocked off.)

    He then mounted the old pump head... plugged in the pump and gave it a test run. Works like a charm!


    [​IMG]
    up and running ( photo / image / picture from cherylad's Garden )


    Next, we have to figure out how to run the electricity. My thought was to dig a trench and bury an extension cord inside PVC pipe. My brother suggested that we should do it the "right" way and run the proper wiring underground. No decision made yet.

    In the meantime, I can start figuring out the waterfall/cascading feature. My brother still likes the idea of having a bird bath at the other end. So, I will looking into adding that back in. I'll be adding some water plants and already have my wish list. Then, all that will be left is to cover up the black tub, hiding the wiring & tubing... and finally make it look cute.

    Updates to follow as I proceed.
     
    eileen, SongofJoy57 and Donna S like this.
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  3. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    Cheryl that looks great. What plants are you going to put in there? What are you going to use to cover the black tub?
     
  4. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

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    Thanks Toni... I haven't quite decided on the plants yet. Top of the list are Pickerels. And then perhaps some Venezuelan Poppy, Golden Alexander, or Water Snowball.
    Plus I still haven't decided on what to cover the tub with. My first idea was to put rocks around it. But my brother made the suggestion of making it look like an old western watering trough by building a rustic wood "box" around it. It sure would be cheaper and alot easier. Either way, that'll be Hubby's project.
     
  5. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    I like the idea of the watering trough, that would look cool.
     



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  6. eileen

    eileen Resident Taxonomist Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    I think the idea your brother had of the trough would look great Cheryl. I love that old pump head and the new fountain container is going to look lovely when it's all planted up.
     
  7. FountainMan

    FountainMan Seedling

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    Looks great. Hope the water lilies do well.
     
  8. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

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    Thanks Fountainman... but no water lilies in this one. There will be too much splashing.

    Thanks Toni and Eileen for the vote of confidence for the wooden trough idea. I'm beginning to lean in that direction too.
     
  9. KK Ng

    KK Ng Hardy Maple

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    Looks great even before it is completed. Well done to you and your team Cherylad. Can't wait to see the finished product!
     
  10. Jerry Sullivan

    Jerry Sullivan Garden Experimenter Plants Contributor

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    Clever use of a hand pump head. As a kid I remember using one in a summer place that had no running water. Always had to remember to not use the last pint of water from the water bucket as it was often needed to prime the pump.

    Jerry
     
  11. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

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    Another step closer to completing.
    I just didn't want the water simply running out of the old pump back into the tub. I envisioned some sort of cascading effect. What better to have water pumped into than a bucket?


    [​IMG]
    pump bucket-front ( photo / image / picture from cherylad's Garden )

    How is it staying tilted like that? Magic?
    Hardly... the bottom sits perfectly on the lip of the old pump. There's a couple of holes there, perhaps I can add some wire to really secure it in place?



    [​IMG]
    pump bucket-back ( photo / image / picture from cherylad's Garden )

    Just wish I could have found an old beat up bucket. I'll just have to keep an eye out for one.
     
    Donna S and MountainGuardian like this.
  12. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    What a nice project, Cheryl. That looks and works very well. It gives your garden a very nice touch.

    Well done!
     
  13. daisybeans

    daisybeans Hardy Maple

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    I like this a lot! I love the collaborative process you, hubby and brother too, and for the record, the wooden trough sounds like it could be really quaint looking. Nice of you to make the tutorial. Your intructions and photos make it look easier than I imagined... Still intimidates me a bit to try it myself though.
     
  14. Danjensen

    Danjensen In Flower

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    very nice its nice when it all works out.

    for the electrics make sure your 100% with the location then use the right cable and put it in conduit and dig it in.

    doesn't take long and looks far better, i put a time socket on the end of mine so that its running when i wake up and when i get home. saves on the electrics
     
  15. FountainMan

    FountainMan Seedling

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    Looks great! One recommendation, if you plan to raise fish in the pond, you might want to treat the metal pump if it rusts. The oxides can be harmfull to the fish. I found this out the hard way in my first watergarden. But anyway everything looks nice.
     
  16. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

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    Fish may be in the future. If I were to treat the pump, what should I use?
    Thanks for suggestion and the compliment.
     

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