Canning Corn advice needed

Discussion in 'Food Preservation and Storage' started by Danjensen, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. Danjensen

    Danjensen In Flower

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2009
    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    113
    Location:
    England
    We canned our first bushel of Corn last year and enjoying it at the moment.

    Need some advice from you guys though.

    1. Doesn't seem to be that much liquid in the can. I filled each can with boiling water from the kettle before lidding. Should i have left them for say an hour then topped them up again?

    2. I'm not sure if this is due to the lack of liquid but the empty Jars have a pattern of corn on them which is really difficult to get off. any tips?

    Thanks for any help
     
  2. Loading...


  3. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,635
    Likes Received:
    1,657
    Location:
    NE Texas
    I never can corn,, I only freeze fully cookd and seasoned so just thaw, heat and eat. The residue is likely starch residue from the kernels. Try baking soda and hot water to soften it then scrub.
     
  4. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2011
    Messages:
    5,525
    Likes Received:
    2,146
    Location:
    north eastern Pennsylvania
    Did you pressure can them?

    I canned many pints last year. I just went and looked to see my water level in the jars. It is all over the place.
    Some is over the corn and some is almost down by half. That shouldn't be a problem.

    [​IMG]

    1. Inspect jar for cracks, leaks,and bulging lids.

    2. Clean off the lid with soap and water.

    3. Open the lid.

    4. Smell the food quickly. If it smells moldy or bad, throw it out, if it is ok go to next tip.

    5. Boil for 10 minutes in pan without lid.

    If you are unsure of the content always use the rules.
     
  5. Danjensen

    Danjensen In Flower

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2009
    Messages:
    440
    Likes Received:
    113
    Location:
    England
    Ok thanks all,

    the corn is fine inside and looks like yours barb thanks for the photo.

    Yup pressure cooked it, but i think i did it too long as the corn is slightly brown
     



    Advertisement
  6. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    8,785
    Likes Received:
    6,625
    Location:
    Central Texas, zone 8
    Different corn varieties cook at different rates. The "super sweet" types cook more quickly, and the older types take a bit longer (I think it has something to do with the thickness of the kernel's skin). That may be why yours is slightly brown.
    That's why I only freeze corn. Just a dip into a boiling water bath, a quick trip into a freezer bag, and then into the freezer. We have three bags left to last us until late June--it won't make it! I may have to raid Barb's pantry :setf_020: .
     
  7. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2011
    Messages:
    8,790
    Likes Received:
    3,925
    I, too, only freeze my corn. I like the texture better. Your water may have boiled out of the jar during processing. Did you let the pressure drop naturally? you didn't run water over your cooker to cool it off faster did you?. doing so will pull the liquid right out of the jar.
     
  8. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2011
    Messages:
    5,525
    Likes Received:
    2,146
    Location:
    north eastern Pennsylvania
    carolyn keiper, I think cooling the canner fast under the water is the most common way to loose liquid out of the jars. I have never done that before.

    I also freeze corn. I like it both ways. Actually I like to have everything both frozen and canned. Carrots, corn, green beans, brussel sprouts, wax beans, pickled cauliflower in jars and fresh frozen cauliflower. I don't do frozen tomatoes.

    I don't know why I like the idea of having frozen and canned of the same stuff. One thing is that somethings can be good for fast means and others just taste better one way or the other. Also if your freezer dies and the food goes bad you still have jars waiting for you on your shelf.

    I also do chicken, meat balls, corned beef, stew beef, stuffed cabbage both ways.

    I am not a prepper........I am just me.....
     
  9. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2011
    Messages:
    8,790
    Likes Received:
    3,925
    You are correct, Barb, not a recommended option for pressure canning. That was what I was asking.. just to make sure....IF he tried to cool it off faster by running water over the canner, than "naturally" letting it drop, that would suck the liquid right out of the jars. At least it has in my experience.

    Sorry, I didn't intend for my response to be confusing. Hopefully I made that clearer and not more confusing :rolleyes:
     
  10. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2011
    Messages:
    5,525
    Likes Received:
    2,146
    Location:
    north eastern Pennsylvania
    I understood what you were saying my dear friend, carolyn keiper. :-D :-D I was just reiterating what you said and that I would not do that. It seems scarey to me. Just picking up that hot pot to get it into the sink, let alone cooling it down quickly would ruin the pot. I know others do it but not me. :-D :-D
     
  11. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2011
    Messages:
    8,790
    Likes Received:
    3,925
    I do it with my pressure cooker when I am cooking directly in it for dinner. Maybe some people have done it or tried it while canning jars of food. No idea, but I suppose it is possible. I have 5 canners so I can just keep canning when I am canning green beans, meat or such That way I don't have to worry about "hurry up!" cooling getting done, just worry about where the pan is sitting on the floor while cooling. It would hurt to kick it accidentally.
     
  12. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    May 5, 2009
    Messages:
    11,679
    Likes Received:
    3,093
    Location:
    S. Liberty County - Texas (8B)
    Why is it called "canning"? Shouldn't it be called "jarring"? :D
     
  13. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2011
    Messages:
    8,790
    Likes Received:
    3,925
    Cheryl, no idea! But I do have an All American brand canner and I can order cans to can with (wow, that sentence can be confusing). But they are not reusable like jars are. Maybe the term came from both being done in the same manner.
     
  14. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2011
    Messages:
    5,525
    Likes Received:
    2,146
    Location:
    north eastern Pennsylvania
    Origonally it was done in cans....
     

Share This Page