Composting to support your garden

Discussion in 'Suggestions / Comments / Help' started by Catdaddy6676, Sep 2, 2018.

  1. Catdaddy6676

    Catdaddy6676 New Seed

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2018
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    38
    Location:
    Lugoff, SC
    I was looking around the site for information on composting so I could improve my soil and general health of my plants. I think it is a basic yet critical component in this great hobby!

    I was dismayed that there was no thread devoted to the proper components, application or procedures to get the best compost. I apologize if this topic has been covered but I was unable to satisfy my curiosity on GardenStew, but I admit I haven't used the search function yet.
     
    Frank and Gail-Steman like this.
  2. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,146
    Likes Received:
    1,070
    Location:
    NE Texas
    Hi there and welcome to the Stew ! First thing is,, same as gardening,,don`t over-think it. Put what you have in the bin,, buy a container of red wigglers at most bait stores,, throw them in and let the worms do all the work. If you have access to livestock manure,,rabbit chicken horse or cow add that as well. Keep it damp and don`t let it dry out, turn it ocassionally and soon you should have a batch of compost. Don`t worry about amounts,, use what you have,, it will turn out fine !
     
    Gail-Steman likes this.
  3. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    8,266
    Likes Received:
    5,462
    Location:
    Central Texas, zone 8
    Mart, as always, is absolutely right! Rot happens, and that is basically what compost is--rotted stuff that is beneficial. Chicken manure needs about 4-6 months to compost, otherwise it has a too high nitrogen content and can "burn" plants. Cow, horse, goat manure is great, let it compost for a few months (depending on how fresh it is--when you can't smell it any more, you can use it). Rabbit and sheep manure can be put directly on gardens. I've been tempted to trap a few of the rabbits around here and squeeze them at the base of my tomato plants!
    It's difficult to mess up compost. When it looks right and doesn't smell, use it. Even if it's a little "new", it will continue to rot in your garden and add beneficial nutrients.
     
    Gail-Steman likes this.
  4. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,146
    Likes Received:
    1,070
    Location:
    NE Texas
    And if you have access to leaf mold as in under oak trees,, that will speed things along with the proper bacteria. Just scrape up the leaves that have already started to rot under the top layer !
     
    Gail-Steman likes this.

Share This Page