Dwarf Red Amulet coreopsis,

Discussion in 'Flower Gardening' started by Melody Mc., May 13, 2022.

  1. Melody Mc.

    Melody Mc. Young Pine

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2022
    Messages:
    1,223
    Likes Received:
    2,896
    Location:
    Interior of Brisith Columbia, Canada
    This spring I had a tomato with extra leaves ( cotyledons) and culled it, thinking something was wrong with it. In fact it could have been a spectacular plant.

    I planted some old coreopsis Dwarf Red Amulet seeds, and only two came up. One was looking strange, and has now shown itself to have extra cotyledons, and now extra leaves. I'm curious to see how it will progress compared to it's companion.

    IMG_1825.JPG

    IMG_1826.JPG
     
    Droopy, eileen and Sjoerd like this.
  2. Loading...

    Similar Threads
    1. Sydney Smith
      Replies:
      4
      Views:
      205,718
    2. donm
      Replies:
      22
      Views:
      233,622

  3. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    17,954
    Likes Received:
    13,464
    I am hoping to see some glorious bloom's. Please do not forget to take a pic.
     
    Melody Mc. likes this.
  4. Melody Mc.

    Melody Mc. Young Pine

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2022
    Messages:
    1,223
    Likes Received:
    2,896
    Location:
    Interior of Brisith Columbia, Canada
    I am hoping so too :) It will be fun to see what it does. Thank you Sjoerd.
     
    Sjoerd likes this.
  5. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2021
    Messages:
    1,057
    Likes Received:
    2,879
    Location:
    Southwest Washington State USA
    That will be beautiful. I hope the mutant variety is stupendous!

    I also grew coreopsis from seeds this year, for the first time, for my meditation garden. They are just the plain yellow ones. No mutants as far as I know.
     
    Melody Mc. and Sjoerd like this.



    Advertisement
  6. Melody Mc.

    Melody Mc. Young Pine

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2022
    Messages:
    1,223
    Likes Received:
    2,896
    Location:
    Interior of Brisith Columbia, Canada
    @Daniel W - my mutant coreopsis is a funny little weirdo hahaha. It keeps going like a star fish with no main shoot. It's seed sibling is three times larger. :suspicious::suspicious: It will be fun to see what transpires in the pot.
     
  7. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2021
    Messages:
    1,057
    Likes Received:
    2,879
    Location:
    Southwest Washington State USA
    You have invented a new variety!
     
  8. Melody Mc.

    Melody Mc. Young Pine

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2022
    Messages:
    1,223
    Likes Received:
    2,896
    Location:
    Interior of Brisith Columbia, Canada
    So....something is amiss here. I have two different plants, not a mutant.

    I think the one on the left is the dwarf red amulet coriopsis....but I'm not sure having never grown it before. The other....I have no idea if it is a flower or weed...or a weed that may flower. hahaha

    If anyone knows which one is the intruder and perhaps who is who, I'd be grateful.
    IMG_2069.JPG

    IMG_2071.JPG

    IMG_2070.JPG
     
    Sjoerd likes this.
  9. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2021
    Messages:
    1,057
    Likes Received:
    2,879
    Location:
    Southwest Washington State USA
    I don't know. Maybe fireweed? Epilobium parviflorum?
     
    Droopy likes this.
  10. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    17,954
    Likes Received:
    13,464
    Mel, I would argue that the one on the right is the choriopsis. The one on the left could indeed be fireweed, but at this stage it could be other things as well.
    Bottom line is that I do not know for sure and these plants are not common here.
    I shall be very interested in see the flowers produced by the two plants in question.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2022
    Melody Mc. likes this.
  11. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2021
    Messages:
    1,057
    Likes Received:
    2,879
    Location:
    Southwest Washington State USA
    I agree with Sjoerd. I have coreopsis at the same stage, and they look exactly like the less vigorous looking one on the right.
     
    Melody Mc. likes this.
  12. Droopy

    Droopy Slug Slaughterer Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2007
    Messages:
    11,904
    Likes Received:
    2,968
    Location:
    Western Norway
    I agree with Daniel on it being a weed, and probably an Epilobium of some kind. We have the Epilobium ciliatum here, and it's pretty annoying even though it's easy to weed.
     
    Melody Mc. likes this.
  13. Melody Mc.

    Melody Mc. Young Pine

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2022
    Messages:
    1,223
    Likes Received:
    2,896
    Location:
    Interior of Brisith Columbia, Canada
    @Droopy - I looked that plant up and it certainly does look like that could be it.

    The misfit wants to bloom soon. Maybe that will be the tell all.

    I do also have mountains of fireweed here, and they all come as one stick with leaves. Could be that with the small container ( 6 inch) it shaped differently?

    This will be vewy vewy interesting..... Thank you folks.

    stay tuned :)
     
    Sjoerd and Droopy like this.
  14. Droopy

    Droopy Slug Slaughterer Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2007
    Messages:
    11,904
    Likes Received:
    2,968
    Location:
    Western Norway
    If it's an Epilobium angustifolium you have a lot of food in your yard. The young stems are cooked like asparagus. The flowers are used to make a soft drink. I helped a friend pick the flowers and got a bottle of concentrate back. It tasted nice. I haven't tried eating them yet. I forget about them until it's too late to pick.
     
    Sjoerd and Melody Mc. like this.
  15. Melody Mc.

    Melody Mc. Young Pine

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2022
    Messages:
    1,223
    Likes Received:
    2,896
    Location:
    Interior of Brisith Columbia, Canada
    Well Daniel.....you were bang on right! My sincere apologies for lumping all fireweed into the same category. My son in law is here to visit, and he is a Biologist - even though his major is Entomology, he also passionate about plants and birds. He took one look at it and , like you, called it willowherb, part of the fireweed family. Then quoted " Epilobium parvilflorum". I should have looked that up instead of stopping at fireweed.

    If I had paid closer attention to your suggestion, I could have lifted the little bushy weed much sooner.

    Thank you so much - and again, I apologize for wearing my blinders. :setc_033:I really appreciate your expertise and knowledge.

    :setc_089::setc_089:

    Thanks so much for the help everyone. Now that it is gone, we will see if that little coreopsis has a better chance :)
     

    Attached Files:

    Droopy likes this.
  16. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2021
    Messages:
    1,057
    Likes Received:
    2,879
    Location:
    Southwest Washington State USA
    @melody, I call that a success story! Your garden is now free of fireweed and soon you will have some nice coreopsis.

    I have a number of coreopsis plants that I started last winter. No idea if they will bloom this year. Other perennials that I started early have lots of flower buds now - Rudbeckias, Ratibida, Gallardia, Carnations, Four O'Clocks. I also started Echinacea but it looks like that may not bloom this year.
     
    Melody Mc. likes this.

Share This Page