Experiment with 30 year old seeds.

Discussion in 'Seed Starting / Propagation' started by S-H, Aug 7, 2020.

  1. S-H

    S-H Young Pine

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    I recently found a packet of seeds which I had sealed and put away in 1990 - Then forgot all about them completely...

    They are from this plant, (see picture below), which is called holiday cheer ornamental chili pepper.

    My Plants - Holiday Cheers.jpg

    It's a very eye-catching plant to have in the garden. But unfortunately I don't have it anymore, (the seeds which I had saved got eaten by insects).

    But now I guess I have another chance at getting this plant back! However the seeds are today very old. And just around 14 to 16 seeds only...

    Anyhow I did some Googling and YouTubing. Even found a video where a person successfully grew a tomato plant from seeds which were over 80 years old, yes eighty, eight-zero, (this isn't a typing error).

    I guess the trick to reviving old seeds and making them sprout - Is to first soak them in sugar water overnight. As sugar seems to restore some of the key nutrients the seed would have otherwise lost over time.

    OK, so now I got the idea, of why not use coconut water instead of sugar water??? I figured, that since coconuts are extremely large seeds themselves - Coconut water would be far more effective at restoring the nutrients those seeds lost in the last 30 years.

    Also, it is my observation, that rainwater during a thunderstorm works like magic when it comes to sprouting very difficult seeds.

    IMG_20200807_110733.jpg

    Now since yesterday I am already experiencing a major once in a lifetime storm which is going to last for over a week, (arrow in the picture above shows where I am situated at the coast).

    So why not use this opportunity?

    IMG_20200807_095521_copy_2880x1620.jpg IMG_20200807_095207_copy_2880x1620.jpg IMG_20200807_095512_copy_2880x1620.jpg IMG_20200807_100534_copy_2880x1620.jpg

    Some seeds were floating, others sank. So those at the bottom I assume will stand a better chance at sprouting.

    I also put a nylon mesh screen over it, so that birds don't pick the seeds or sprouts, (if any). And thunderstorm droplets also are very big and heavy. So hopefully the screen will soften the impacts of the heavy downpour.

    Here is a video I found, explaining why rainwater from a thunderstorm is so beneficial for plants and seeds.

     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2020
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  3. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic In Flower

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    The pH of rain water, like distilled water, is more like 6, and thus mildly acidic. This can have electrical connotations where coconuts may not have similiar effect.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2020
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  4. S-H

    S-H Young Pine

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    Most valuable input Dirtmechanic! :smt023

    Anyhow I did what I did because coconut water is sweet tasting also, so it has got some amount of sugar in it too, (I assume).

    There is another myth from World War 2 also. Where coconut water was injected directly into the bloodstream of soldiers in the tropics, (when field medics ran out of regular supplies).

    https://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2014/12/09/4143229.htm

    I however did that, because I figured that since coconuts themselves are seeds too. They would contain similar nutrients other seeds would have.

    Only reason why I didn't use any regular sugar, is because I doubt it's purity. As there are many other chemicals used in turning it into white sugar, from the natural raw brown sugar which over here - Which is extracted from sugarcane. This raw brown sugar, I did not have (not easy to obtain either) - And with the global Coronavirus pandemic, I wasn't going to go looking for it...

    Sugar in Northern America is extracted from corn, (which some say is the reason why obesity is now a problem in their society). So I thought that since my sugar isn't the same anyway, as we extract it from sugarcane - Why not try something new?

    That's why I tried coconut water.

    However now so much thunderstorm rainwater has fallen on those seeds, that I doubt any trace of coconut water remains.

    In about a week to 10 days, we should know it this was a good idea or not.

    :D
     
  5. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

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    how are the seeds doing ?
     



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  6. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic In Flower

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  7. S-H

    S-H Young Pine

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