For Frank

Discussion in 'Jokes and Games' started by marlingardener, May 31, 2019.

  1. marlingardener

    marlingardener Happy

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    I just found out it takes five sheep to make a wool sweater. I didn't even know they could knit!
     
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  3. eileen

    eileen Resident Taxonomist Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    I've seen them in the village hall here clicking and clacking with their knitting needles Jane. They do tend to make sweaters with four leg holes though!! :headscratch:
     
  4. mart

    mart Strong Ash

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    Oh Really ? Send me a link to their website ! I have a few dogs that could use one this winter !
     
  5. Jerry Sullivan

    Jerry Sullivan Garden Experimenter Plants Contributor

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    Does anybody raise sheep? I have a sheep question. Why trim sheep's hoofs? If it is to prevent infection, lameness and promote healthy hoofs in young animals, what did the sheep do before humans came along? I am baaaaaaaaffled

    Question from a concrete jungle kid.

    Jerry
     
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  6. Frank

    Frank GardenStew Founder Staff Member Administrator

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    Ewe wouldn't believe the garments I've seen produced.

    They do tend to get infected a lot. We call it foot rot. It's as nasty as it sounds. Fortunately a trimming and dipping in bluestone (copper sulphate) normally does the trick.

    You got me there.
     
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  7. mart

    mart Strong Ash

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    Before humans and domestication their diet was different as was their territory ! Same with horses ! Their territory was more rocky and the diet of grasses was much lower in protein so hooves didn`t grow fast and were much tougher than today ! Nature told them what they needed to eat but walking the distances to find it naturally wore down the hooves !
    Then along came humans and started feeding what we thought they needed and although the sheep were more productive,, we also had to fix what we screwed up,, trim hooves ect !
    I have 6 horses that have been running barefoot for about 10 years,, they have the correct alignment and have not even been trimmed in years,, Have not needed it but they are in a large pasture,, not stalled or fed the higher protein feeds !
     
  8. Jerry Sullivan

    Jerry Sullivan Garden Experimenter Plants Contributor

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    Thanks Mart, a most informative explanation! It seems that 10,000 years of domestication and breeding has its own problems.

    Jerry
     
  9. Frank

    Frank GardenStew Founder Staff Member Administrator

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    Wonderful explanation @mart , makes complete sense.
     

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