Foundation planting

Discussion in 'Garden Design' started by pjadams, May 14, 2010.

  1. pjadams

    pjadams New Seed

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    My house is in the woods. We have a very small grass area just around the house and the lawn is sort of a free form shape, with woods all the way around. Very informal, even wild. So my plantings are all that way too, no formal shapes at all. More like a cottage garden except mostly green.
    The north side is ivy and holly and looks wonderful and woodsy. The east side is ferns, ivy and hostas. Again so informal. The south side is seldom ever seen. That foundation planting edges the garage and is day lilies and lunaria, and I'd like it to be also black eyed susans and echinacea. They've never done well there, always die.

    Now, the front, the west. I have vinca, bulbs and mums when they grow. It gets full west sun and is in a sharp rectangle bed under the livingroom windows and hard edged by the front walk. The front NW is ok with the vinca, mint, columbine etc because it gets so much shade. But today I see the mint and goldenrod have really taken over so maybe I have to start fresh here also.


    But that rectangle bed is messing me up! (see photo) Yday I realized that our house is all edges and squares, but especially that front area...it looks almost modern and the walk makes that bed look confined and modern, stark.

    Could it need to be a formal bed? Wouldn't that be out of place with the rest of the property? I don't know what to do but I've got to do it.



    [​IMG]
    Front foundation bed ( photo / image / picture from pjadams's Garden )
     
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  3. pjadams

    pjadams New Seed

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    Oops! I should have given the dimensions of the bed.
    My front foundation bed is 18 feet long by about 3 feet deep. It is edged by sidewalk and foundation in a rigid rectangle.
     
  4. designshare

    designshare New Seed

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    The photo is too close up.You really need to post some pics that show the context and situated and conditions and the property line and the perimeter
    of the yard and You need one that shows the overall yard.
    I try to some.


    [​IMG]
    ( photo / image / picture from designshare's Garden )
     
  5. designshare

    designshare New Seed

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  6. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    pjadams Oh, look how warm designshare made it. He even gave you a rock border in the last picture. Love that.

    Barb in Pa.
     
  7. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    How do you feel about daisy-like perennials: asters, black-eyed susans and taller hollyhocks? You could soften the sidewalk edges with ajuga and lambs ears, they always stretch out for me. My yard is shaded too, so ferns pop up everywhere and they also add "the bouquet effect" to a flower bed :stew1: For winter structure a variety of grasses ( short and medium heights help.

    Happy gardening whatever you decide
     
  8. designshare

    designshare New Seed

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    Thank waretrop for the comment.I repeat try to plant combinations and contrast and shrubs mix and coordinate colors.

    [​IMG]
    ( photo / image / picture from designshare's Garden )
     
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