Grafting Tomatoes Chilies & Eggplant On Potatoes.

Discussion in 'Fruit and Veg Gardening' started by S-H, Apr 6, 2024.

  1. S-H

    S-H Hardy Maple

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    It's something I've been thinking about trying for many years now. But I wasn't inspired enough - Not until I saw this non biodegradable fabric grow bag. Which obviously would now make things very easy for me.

    Anybody over here have any experience with such techniques? I ask because there are many videos on YouTube now, which are fake, (they just make them to generate views).

    Screenshot_20240406-232114.jpg





     
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  3. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

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    S-H I have grafted tomatoes. Theres a bit of an art to it but it works.

    In my case, I wanted more vigor and disease resistance. There are tomato rootstocks especially bred for those traits and strong nematode resistance. Supposedly they are widely used in Europe and Asia. Tomato plants grafted onto those rootstocks are amazingly vigorous. So it really works for those.

    A lot of Solanaceae are graftable - tomato, potato, peppers, eggplants. I don't know if the rootstocks are interchangeable.

    A University project using peppers.

    https://u.osu.edu/vegnetnews/2019/09/21/one-example-of-how-grafting-may-benefit-pepper-growers/

    Then there's the tomato - on - potato graft. I have not done that. It looks like a gimmick, but it supposedly is done. The energy products of photosyntheses can only go so far - if there are potatoes, then less tomatoes? And vice versa? I don't know.

    If you do it, please keep us posted! You never know until you try.

    You reminded me. One year my dad gave me a couple of upside - down tomato planters, like these.

    IMG_7066.jpeg

    I tried it. In my climate, and the soil that I used, and location, it dried out too fast and the tomatoes didn't do well at all. Plus, the dirty water drains through onto the tomato plant. When I was searching for an image, I saw that some gardeners use a regular hanging pot and plant the tomato upside down.

    IMG_7067.jpeg

    They planted flowers on top and tomato in a hole in the bottom, so double use of the pot.
     
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  4. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

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    Oh - also, I've grown potatoes in containers including fabric bags. It worked pretty well for me.
     
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  5. S-H

    S-H Hardy Maple

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    That's excellent! This is exactly what I wanted to know. Thanks!

    I'm not aiming for a huge harvest, just want to familiarize myself with the methods - Basically to use space more efficiently, like in a greenhouse, (which too I plan on building, so I can always grow my own food in case of another pandamic, or war, or both at the same time)...
     
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