Hydranga's

Discussion in 'Hydrangea' started by Anniejoe, Apr 24, 2005.

  1. Anniejoe

    Anniejoe New Seed

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    I love Hydranga's and would ike to start a few bushes at this time 4/05 :D Any tips anyone could offer? do they flower right away? Do I need direct sun? Is Western New York a good growing spot for them?
    Thanks!!!! :D
     
  2. Frank

    Frank GardenStew Founder Staff Member Administrator

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    Ok here goes AnnieJoe,

    The Hydrangea is a very hardy plant and can survive even in overgrown gardens so I wouldn't worry about having 'perfect' growing conditions. From what I know they like sun but also can grow in shady spots. Be careful of too much sun because they can scorch. Their shoots also need a lot of moisture during the summer.

    A fascinating aspect of the Hydrangea is that you can change its colour by altering the pH of the soil it grows in! How cool is that. An acidic soil produces blue flowers and at the other end of the scale pink flowers are produced.

    [​IMG]
    Blue flower Hydrangea

    [​IMG]
    Pink flower Hydrangea


    I'm sure it should be no problem at all to grow them in Western New York AnnieJoe :)

    Has anybody any nice experiences growing Hydrangeas or for that matter any nightmares?
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    ARE HYDRANGA'S POISONOUS TO PETS? KELLI
     
  4. Frank

    Frank GardenStew Founder Staff Member Administrator

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    Hi Kelli and welcome to "the Stew" 8)

    I know for a fact that the leaves and buds of Hydrangeas are poisonous to cats and dogs so i guess this applies across the board to all pets. You should take the appropriate measures to make sure that yours pets do not have easy access to them, e.g. fencing them off.

    Does this help you Kelli?
     



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  5. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I have what looks like a very healthy hydrangea bush, it greens beautifully every year but never blooms. I used to cut it back every year but 2003 I stopped cutting it back but still no blooms. Any suggestiond to help me get this plant to bloom? It has great sentimental value and I WILL NOT give up on it
     
  6. Frank

    Frank GardenStew Founder Staff Member Administrator

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    Hi NanaBarto and you're very welcome to GardenStew :)

    A couple of questions:
    - Has the hydrangea ever bloomed?
    - Where did you get the hydrangea from originally?

    It could just be that the variety of hydrangea you have is just not suitable to its area. If we get your answers to the above questions we will be able to give you a better answer ;)
     
  7. sumrboating

    sumrboating New Seed

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    Hydranga

    I have two small Hydrangas and the were absolutely beautiful. Within the past week the leaves are shriveling up and the flowers look like they are dying as well. I'd like to plant them outside this weekend but am not sure if I should do that or take them back to the store. I bought them at Whole foods in Minneapolis on Mother's Day weekend

    Any suggestions to bring them back?

    Thanks
     
  8. Frank

    Frank GardenStew Founder Staff Member Administrator

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    Hi sumrboating and welcome to GardenStew.com :smt026 Maybe you'd like to tell us more about yourself here: http://www.gardenstew.com/forum-29.html


    Now on to your question. I am not familiar with the Whole Foods store but I am guessing that the hydrangeas where bought specifically as a gift, correct? If so it is often the case that these types of hydrangeas were grown entirely in a greenhouse and 'engineered' to produce wonderful blooms for a certain occasion. Therefore the plant may not be very hardy and may fade away.

    It would be better to try and plant them outdoors but due to there initial growing methods may not perform very well.

    Hope this helps :smt047
     
  9. PeggySuetheStew

    PeggySuetheStew Seedling

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    Tell us more!

    :cry: But Gardenstew, there were some questions about hydrangeas that were left unanswered ... To prune, or not to prune ... how long until they bloom ... do tell all you know so mine don't go to 'rune!
    I planted two hydrangeas last year and am a tad confused, one is nice and big but shows no signs of blooms, the other (a dwarf variety) is showing some buds. The larger of the two had a long leafless woody stalk that I cut back, but perhaps shouldn't have; the other was left alone. Any suggestions would be appreciated! :!:
     
  10. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I received a hydranga in 2002. It had pink blooms on it. I planted it that same year, but it has never bloomed since. The plant looks very healthy, but I just can't figure out why it will not bloom. Any help would be appreciated.
     
  11. mbwest

    mbwest Seedling

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    Sounds like a good looking interesting plant, worried about it being poisonous though.

    May try and grow it fenced off.
     
  12. PeggySuetheStew

    PeggySuetheStew Seedling

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    Don't give up hope! Mine have finally started to show buds! All of the other locals have been blooming for a while now. Is there a soil that they prefer? I am still wondering about the pruning issue ...
     
  13. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    hydrangea

    My mom has hydrangeas, and she has tried every soil additive to get them to bloom blue, would it work if i buried lemons with them?
     
  14. PeggySuetheStew

    PeggySuetheStew Seedling

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    Will I get more blooms if I cut them and bring inside to enjoy?
     
  15. Frank

    Frank GardenStew Founder Staff Member Administrator

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    Re: hydrangea

    Hi Jessi and a big welcome to GardenStew :wave: :smt023

    As for the lemons, I have never heard of this but it makes sense. My guess is that it may not have the power you would expect it to though but as I said I never heard of this being done before. As a rule it is harder to make soil acidic then it is to make it alkaline. I'm sure it can do no harm to try it out :)

    And Peggy as for bringing them inside I shouldn't think it would make a big difference to the blooms, of course inside you have more control so maybe. No beavers inside right :) :smt023
     

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