Items that are toxic / dangerous to our pets

Discussion in 'Pets' started by Frank, Nov 21, 2012.

  1. Frank

    Frank GardenStew Founder Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2005
    Messages:
    17,361
    Likes Received:
    1,423
    Location:
    Originally Galway, Ireland
    A lot of the time we may not be aware that what we are feeding to our pets can be dangerous, or in a worst case scenario toxic. This topic will be an attempt to maintain a list of those items split into categories of pet. Please help us update the lists by posting your additions below!


    Dogs:
    --------
    - Chocolate / caffeine - toxic
    - Grapes / raisins - toxic
    - Onions / Garlic - toxic
    - Xylitol (sugar substitute commonly found in chewing gum / candy) - toxic
    - Macadamia nuts - toxic
    - Yeast bread dough (expansion after digestion, ethanol poisoning) - toxic
    - Paracetamol (affects oxygen transport in the blood) - toxic
    - Fat content of turkey fat, drippings, and skin - dangerous
    - Poinsettia (plant) - dangerous
    - Poultry bones (tend to shatter when chewed, forming shards) - dangerous
    - Balloons, tinsel, shoe laces, string, ribbon and yarn (digestive complications) - dangerous

    Cats:
    --------
    - Chocolate / caffeine - toxic
    - Grapes / raisins - toxic
    - Onions / Garlic - toxic
    - Yeast bread dough (expansion after digestion, ethanol poisoning) - toxic
    - Paracetamol (affects oxygen transport in the blood) - toxic
    - Fat content of turkey fat, drippings, and skin - dangerous
    - Poinsettia (plant) - dangerous
    - Poultry bones (tend to shatter when chewed, forming shards) - dangerous
    - Balloons, tinsel, shoe laces, string, ribbon and yarn (digestive complications) - dangerous

    --------
    For a list of toxic plants see the following link:
    http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control/plants/

    Thanks to mart, carolyn keiper, marlingardener, toni, Netty, daffodil, eileen.
     
    Droopy and Philip Nulty like this.
  2. Loading...

    Similar Threads
    1. marlingardener
      Replies:
      4
      Views:
      973
    2. donna in nc
      Replies:
      5
      Views:
      991

  3. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    3,627
    Likes Received:
    1,636
    Location:
    NE Texas
    With the holidays around the corner, don`t forget that poinsettia are deadly for pets. Almost lost my dog for just carrying a leaf in its mouth. People with animals should go with artificial poinsettia for the holidays. Took two weeks of round the clock care to get mine over it. Had she chewed the leaf, she would not have lived.
     
    Frank and donna in nc like this.
  4. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2011
    Messages:
    8,778
    Likes Received:
    3,898
    xylitol is toxic to dogs. Do not let them eat gum or other such stuff with it in it.
     
    Frank likes this.
  5. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    8,756
    Likes Received:
    6,552
    Location:
    Central Texas, zone 8
    Poultry bones are bad for dogs, and also cats. These bones tend to shatter when chewed, forming shards that can penetrate stomach linings and intestines. Cooked ham bones are fine for dogs, since they don't shatter but break up into small pieces with rounded edges.
    Steak bones and pork bones such as pork chop bones, cooked or raw, are problematic. As a precaution, you probably shouldn't give them to dogs or cats.
     
    Frank likes this.



    Advertisement
  6. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    19,186
    Likes Received:
    4,480
    Location:
    North Central Texas, Zone 8a
    If you put silver tinsel on your xmas tree make sure your pets don't start playing with it and accidentally swallow it. It will get wrapped around the inside of the gut and can either kill them or cost several thousands of dollars for surgery and vet care.

    Shoe laces, string, ribbon and yarn will do the same thing.
     
    Frank likes this.
  7. Netty

    Netty Chaotic Gardener Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2006
    Messages:
    16,784
    Likes Received:
    2,514
    Location:
    Southern Ontario zone 5b
    My cat loves to eat that skinny curling ribbon that is around at Christmas time so I don't buy it. BUT recently my daughter got a helium filled balloon that had this ribbon attached. I didn't think about it at the time, but the next morning the ribbon looked chewed and there was a small pile of vomit beside the stool I had it tied to. My cat is OK but think I was very lucky this was all that happened. I tend to associate this ribbon with Christmas so I didn't even think about the fact it was ribbon attached to the balloon.
     
    Frank likes this.
  8. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    8,756
    Likes Received:
    6,552
    Location:
    Central Texas, zone 8
    Netty, I'm glad you mentioned balloons. Dogs think they are balls (and some cats do, too) and try to catch them. Dogs can injest balloon rubber, which does awful things to their digestive tract. Cats tend to claw more than bite, so balloons are less of a danger.
    Don't get me started on what helium filled balloons, especially when released en masse to "celebrate" an event, do to birds!
     
  9. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2011
    Messages:
    8,778
    Likes Received:
    3,898
    Bread dough(not baked bread). It expands inside their stomachs.

    coffee (it contains caffeine)

    Macadamia nuts. Toxic (but unknown why they are toxic)
     
  10. daffodil

    daffodil New Seed

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2013
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    victoria bc
  11. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    8,756
    Likes Received:
    6,552
    Location:
    Central Texas, zone 8
    Last weekend we helped at the Waco Zoo's Poison Safari which was an educational program for parents/children about toxic plants. We prepared a tri-fold about plants toxic to humans, and ones toxic to pets. We talked to visitors about the common landscape plants that are dangerous, as well as ones found in the wild.
    Daffodil, we used the ASPCA site as a reference.
    We are constantly amazed at the lack of knowledge about plants, toxic or not, that adults show. Their children are equally ignorant, having been raised on carpet and asphalt most of their lives.
    Over 1,000 people left the zoo with at least a partial knowledge of poisonous plants and what they look like.
    We just kept emphasizing "Don't eat it, don't put it in your mouth!"
     
  12. wendyjames2

    wendyjames2 New Seed

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2013
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    7
    Oh my, I didn't know bread dough is a no-no...I'm glad I read this.
     
  13. james123

    james123 New Seed

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2013
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    India
    I do not know much about the pet’s food. I was totally unaware that what we are feeding to our pets can be dangerous to them. Thanks to you all for sharing this informative knowledge.
     
  14. eileen

    eileen Resident Taxonomist Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    27,612
    Likes Received:
    3,955
    Location:
    Scotland
    I know this isn't a food but did you realise that Paracetemol can kill a cat within four hours and is also dangerous if given to dogs? It's always best to consult a vet if your pet is ill and not to try treating them at home.
     
    Frank likes this.
  15. Sakura

    Sakura New Seed

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2014
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Midwest
    I feel I must say that they can vary like allergies however best to avoid over test

    The reason I say that is shortly after we got our puppy she got at possibly 4 Cadbury cream eggs (I love the things) from what I understand she had a terrible night shaking and such in her cage I was at work totally unaware of what was going on --well she got thru it and she now eats much of what we do if she gets chocolate it's only enough to taste I personally am extra careful but I can't see punishing when she is so smart

    She really is a one of a kind to the ones I've grown up with she needs you to be more assertive she KNOWS where we are she LOVES car rides she is just special,

    *note* just because I do I still do NOT advise it! Carob is doggy chocolate that's all I'd say to try NOT human chocolate! She COULD have died! I don't think I can make enough a point dogs I've heard DO die from chocolate I've heard last thing I want is to loose my puppy!
     
    Frank likes this.
  16. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2011
    Messages:
    8,778
    Likes Received:
    3,898
    Sakura, Punishment is not what you are doing by prohibiting your dog chocolate. It is an issue of safety. she/he doesn't understand "punishment" in the form of him/her not being allowed to have it. You are being responsible to not let her have any chocolate. That's okay. I LOVE my dog, but I don't allow her to have something I am eating just because I think it is divine. We give her her own treats, never our snacks. She is now trained to not "beg" for anything that we eat, unless it is peppers. She loves peppers, so I give her the core and some of the flesh and she leaves me a nice pile of pepper seeds to clean up.
     

Share This Page