Lawn Damage from constuction vehicles

Discussion in 'Lawn Care' started by MikeLowery, Aug 4, 2008.

  1. MikeLowery

    MikeLowery New Seed

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hey folks,

    A month or so ago I had about eight large trees removed from my backyard. A few were dying and leaning towards the house. The others were removed so that the backyard can be developed.

    Here's my issue. The tires of the vehicles that were used to take down the trees have left indentations in my lawn. How do you fix this? My only guess is to pour new soil/dirt in the indentations and hope that the grass grows through the new soil thereby releveling my lawn.....???? Something tells me that is not the answere but I cannot think of anything else.

    Any suggestions.
     
  2. Loading...


  3. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    19,446
    Likes Received:
    4,763
    Location:
    North Central Texas, Zone 8a
    The problem is the soil has been compacted by the weight of the trucks. It's had the air pushed out and the hardness will not allow water to penetrate nor the roots of new grass.

    Not knowing how large the areas are I don't know if this feasable but I would think using a tiller, adding compost while you are at it and reseeding or sodding the area would be the best way to get the lawn back into shape.
     
  4. gardenmama

    gardenmama In Flower

    Joined:
    May 26, 2008
    Messages:
    575
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Vermont
    I agree with Toni. that seems to be the best idea. :stew1:
     
  5. Papa2mykids

    Papa2mykids Seedling

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2006
    Messages:
    156
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Kentwood, Michigan
    Tilling to fluff up the soil is needed.

    Plant roots need oxygen to breathe and grow, compacted soil does a lot of damage.

    The tree removal people should know that and should've taken precautions to minimize the damage.

    Ron
     



    Advertisement
  6. bunkie

    bunkie Young Pine

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
    Messages:
    2,080
    Likes Received:
    449
    Location:
    eastern washington
  7. tschnath

    tschnath In Flower

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Messages:
    823
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    Southern Maine (zone 5)
    Yep, Toni is right. We went through this last year after we removed a bunch of trees. Our grass did not come back this year and we need to redo it again but since we're digging up a new garden space we just decided to wait. Good luck.
     
  8. Bestlawn

    Bestlawn New Seed

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    SE Michigan
    You don't want to till. Tilling will disturb the tilth (among other things) and will cause you to have to reseed but if reseeding was not already necessary, then don't do anything to require it. You want to aerate the lawn. Where you are located determines the time of year to do that. Southern areas grow warm season type turfgrass. Northern areas grow cool season type turfgrass. If it's cool season type, then you can get ready to aerate very soon, as we will soon be entering into the fall growing season. Your type of soil, whether clay or sandy, will determine whether to core aerate or spike aerate. Aerating will cause a mess, as the cores are left all around to mulch themselves back into the soil, but the grass will recover in about two weeks.
     

Share This Page