Making Hot Sauce.

Discussion in 'Recipes and Cooking' started by Daniel W, Oct 10, 2022.

  1. josephbut

    josephbut New Seed

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    Dirtmechanic, it sounds like you're quite the pepper aficionado, and your approach to preserving them is intriguing. Freezing and fermenting certainly bring their unique flavors and textures to the table.

    Speaking of flavors, have you ever considered adding a twist to your pepper sauce with a Homemade Yum Yum Sauce Recipe? While it might not be a traditional pairing, it's a versatile condiment that can add a delightful touch to various dishes.

    Your exploration of different preservation methods and flavors is impressive. Keep up the tasty work, and I hope your pepper sauce turns out wonderfully!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 21, 2023
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  2. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    I intended to convey that it would be our weather doing the freezing. I have one of those electric tomato presses and softening the veg keeps the screens from bending or blowing out so mostly I boil. In hot peppers boiling allows for some reduction in the heat side of the heat to flavor ratio as you leave at least something in the water. Prior to that I was using a hand me down chinios and pestle but that was to much work and too messy for me. I love the unique flavors of the large variety of hot peppers out there but its the flavor I am after not the heat. I enjoy a sweet pepper, bell pepper etc but they get served up so often that those flavors can get a little common.
     
  3. Odif

    Odif Young Pine

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    @Dirtmechanic I seriously doubt that you can lactoferment your chillies after freezing and cooking. The fermentation process usually works with raw foods as a way of preserving them. One you tuber called "chilichump" was able to get the fermentation going but only when he mixed frozen with fresh chillis. I do not remember the ratio, but I think he used more fresh than frozen.
     
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  4. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    I wonder why lactobacillus or the other bacteria such as in yogurts or kimchi or sourkraut would behave as if their food source was gone after it was heated. I would think the sugars would still be there to some degree. You have raised an interesting question. So its try and die or read it to death for me! Guess which path I will choose and get a free tomato seed!
     
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  5. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    Sorry I am so dense. I understand that boiling pastuerizes the peppers.

    I add what I want afterwards because the inoculums also bend the flavors.

    In this case I just assumed I was going to add some sourkraut juice after boiling and cooling.

    I have been buying from the New England Cheese company and keep the yeasty packets in the freezer for creme fraiche'. I suspect they sell others. I thought at some point I would get around to looking into whether anyone sold some pepper purposed yeasts.

    Yogurt usually has about 4 types. Buttermilk 1. I am not even sure what is in sourkraut or kimchi for that matter but those seem useful.


    By the way has anyone tried their peppers in honey? I hear hot honey is a thing for pizza.

    The website is jacked up as usual and cannot process the camera to website link as usual sayin its to large. I do not have time to chase the obvious but what you missed was a picture of boiling peppers with crystallized ginger to get us started
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2023
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  6. Daniel W

    Daniel W Young Pine

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    @Dirtmechanic, I don't see why you can't add an inoculum to the peppers after they are cooked and have cooled down. If anything, the cooking should release sugars into the liquid, so they might ferment faster.

    I don't know what effect that process will have on texture or flavor.

    If the sauerkraut or kimchi is uncooked, the lactobacillus should be alive and grow in your peppers. I use fresh sauerkraut juice to jump start mine.
     
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