Medicinal herbs?

Discussion in 'Herb Gardening' started by AAnightowl, Apr 24, 2019.

  1. AAnightowl

    AAnightowl Young Pine

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,540
    Likes Received:
    521
    Location:
    Missouri
    Would this also be the spot for medicinal herbs? (some are thought of as 'weeds')
     
    S-H and Gail-Steman like this.
  2. Loading...


  3. eileen

    eileen Resident Taxonomist Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    28,213
    Likes Received:
    4,615
    Location:
    Scotland
    Yes this forum should be OK for medicinal herbs. :stew2:
     
    S-H, Gail-Steman and AAnightowl like this.
  4. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    19,573
    Likes Received:
    4,933
    Location:
    North Central Texas, Zone 8a
    Woo,hoo a discussion after my own heart.
     
    S-H, Gail-Steman and AAnightowl like this.
  5. Paula_Y

    Paula_Y New Seed

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Miami, Florida
    Is this the only herbs thread on the forum? I persuaded my husband to grow some plants as for experiment and wanted to consult with people on how to arrange the process. After all, you need special LED lighting and a dehumidifier like in the list, and just to know the tricks, right? No specialists here at all?
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2020



    Advertisement
  6. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    9,852
    Likes Received:
    8,756
    Location:
    Central Texas, zone 8
    Paula, you may be overthinking growing herbs. You are in Miami and have pretty much ideal conditions for growing outside. Buy started plants, or seeds, and put them in pots outside. Here in Texas I place the herbs in morning and early afternoon sun, then in shade. Watch your area to see where these conditions are and place the pots there so you don't have to run out and move them daily. Don't over water (rule of thumb--if you put your thumb down in the pot's soil and the soil is dry up to the second joint, water.) Herbs like lean soil, so don't fertilize heavily. Herbs are pretty easy, and very rewarding!
     
    AAnightowl likes this.
  7. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2006
    Messages:
    19,573
    Likes Received:
    4,933
    Location:
    North Central Texas, Zone 8a
    If you will be growing them for medicinal purposes then you need to find a college that offers herbal medicine courses. Those courses you will need to not only learn how grow them but how to use them safely. On most gardening forums like ours, herbs are grown for food flavoring or making a relaxing tea or maybe a salve to treat bug bites.
     
    AAnightowl and S-H like this.
  8. Paula_Y

    Paula_Y New Seed

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Miami, Florida
    Oh my, must it be that complicated? :( I thought that would be enough just to find someone who would be ready to consult me from time to time. I get that's probably a little bit boldly, but still. But maybe you are right, though. Thanks, anyway. I'll consider that..
     
  9. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    9,852
    Likes Received:
    8,756
    Location:
    Central Texas, zone 8
    Paula, members here are hesitant to give advice on anything "medicinal" because we never know of any allergies, conditions, or level of knowledge of the poster.
    I suggest, if you can't find a course on medicinal herbs, you at least buy a book or two and study up on herbs and their uses. I suggest starting with John Lust's The Herb Book (ISBN 0-553-26770-1) which is a very complete catalog of herbs with good illustrations so you know what you are getting your hands on.
     
    AAnightowl likes this.
  10. S-H

    S-H Young Pine

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,120
    Likes Received:
    1,708
    Location:
    Karachi, Pakistan
    There is a 2009 BBC 2 TV documentary which was called Grow Your Own Drugs.

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00j4j41/episodes/guide

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00pst7w/episodes/guide

    It was all about how to grow, maintain, as well as easily synthesize your own medicines, without leaving your home. Many of the processes shown are actually 100s of years old. But still being use by giant pharmaceutical companies, unchanged.

    I suggest you all buy DVDs of this TV series from somewhere. Let me see if they are available on Amazon...

    There you go, (didn't even take me 2 minutes to dig it up)! :D

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Grow-Your-Own-Drugs-DVD/dp/B00264GLCE

    I too have it saved - It's actually essential stuff to keep for all doomsday preppers. As well as those who favor off-grid living.

    Editing this post now - I just found the entire series 1 & 2 of this TV program uploaded on YouTube, (over 6 hour long video).



    You can now go to this link below, and download any video from YouTube completely for free!

    https://ytmp3.cc/en13/

    Click on option mp3, and only the audio will be downloaded and saved, (this is how people download songs and music from YouTube). But click on mp4, and the entire video plus audio will be downloaded and saved in your computer. You can then decide to burn it on a DVD yourself. Or keep on a USB thumb drive as backup.

    All the information for anyone who is reading this, is now just one click away!

    :cool:
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2020
    AAnightowl likes this.
  11. Odif

    Odif Young Pine

    Joined:
    May 2, 2017
    Messages:
    1,365
    Likes Received:
    2,018
    Location:
    pyrenees orientales
    I have quite a good knowledge of medicinal plants, I have to go to work now, but later I will reply more extensively. I have also grown under lights, so I have some knowledge of this too.
     
    AAnightowl and S-H like this.
  12. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    4,862
    Likes Received:
    2,976
    Location:
    NE Texas
    Unless you are growing underground you need none of that ! Like MG said,, herbs are basically weeds and do best grown the same way ! just put them in a pot and set them outside,, minimum water and the only fertilizer I would use is one of the soluble ones and that at half strength !
    Have no idea where you got a "list" like that ! No tricks,, just stick them in the dirt and let them grow ! The less care the better !
     
    AAnightowl and marlingardener like this.
  13. AAnightowl

    AAnightowl Young Pine

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,540
    Likes Received:
    521
    Location:
    Missouri
    Cool. I have loads of 'herbs' and weeds growing here. But it does help if you know the plants you want to use, what they are for, etc. IF you have allergies, be extra careful. You can have a bad reaction to herbs the same as to RX medicines. I cannot use valerian and Echinacea for instance. If you have pollen allergies you are allergic to the plant too. You should also avoid using bee pollen supplements.

    Growing the herbs is fun, and you can enjoy the flowers perhaps in your garden. I have Echinacea (aka purple cone flowers, but they also come in white! Some of mine made white ones, and you can get the white ones online. Look up white Echinacea.) I never knew that until my purple coneflowers made some white offspring this year.
     
    marlingardener likes this.
  14. Adam Reed

    Adam Reed New Seed

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2021
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Products added to herbal preparations may also cause interactions. Be aware that "natural" does not mean "safe." It's important to tell your healthcare providers about any herb or dietary supplement you are using.

    Chamomile
    (Flower)

    Considered by some to be a cure-all, chamomile is commonly used in the U.S. for anxiety and relaxation. It is used in Europe for wound healing and to reduce inflammation or swelling. Few studies have looked at how well it works for any condition. Chamomile is used as a tea or applied as a compress. It is considered safe by the FDA. It may increase drowsiness caused by medicines or other herbs or supplements. Chamomile may interfere with the way the body uses some medicines, causing too high a level of the medicine in some people.

    Chamomile for the skin (topical) may be used to treat skin irritation from radiation cancer treatments. Chamomile in capsule form may be used to control vomiting during chemotherapy.

    Echinacea
    (Leaf, stalk, root)

    Echinacea is commonly used to treat or prevent colds, flu, and infections, and for wound healing. Many studies have looked at how well echinacea works to prevent or shorten the course of a cold, but none were conclusive. Some studies do show some benefit of using echinacea for upper respiratory infections.

    Short-term use is advised because other studies have also shown that long-term use can affect the body's immune system. Always check with your healthcare provider about any interactions with medicines that you are already taking. People allergic to plants in the daisy family may be more likely to have an allergic reaction to echinacea. The daisy family includes ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, and daisies.

    Feverfew
    (Leaf)

    Feverfew was traditionally used to treat fevers. It is now commonly used to prevent migraines and treat arthritis. Some research has shown that certain feverfew preparations can prevent migraines. Side effects include mouth ulcers if the leaves are chewed and digestive irritation. People who suddenly stop taking feverfew for migraines may have their headaches return. Feverfew should not be used with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines because these medicines may change how well feverfew works. It should not be used with warfarin or other anticoagulant medicines.

    Garlic
    (Cloves, root)

    Garlic has been used all over the world in cooking and for its many medicinal properties. The compounds isolated from garlic have been shown to have antimicrobial, cardioprotective, anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties. These properties may play a role in the belief that garlic helps lower cholesterol and blood pressure. Unfortunately, the evidence is conflicting. The FDA considers garlic safe. But it can increase the risk of bleeding and should not be used with warfarin, a blood thinner. For the same reason, large amounts should not be taken before dental procedures or surgery.

    Ginger
    (Root)

    Ginger is most commonly known as an herb for easing nausea and motion sickness. Research suggests that ginger may relieve the nausea caused by pregnancy and chemotherapy. Other areas under investigation in the use of ginger are in surgery and as an anticancer agent. It's wide range of actions may be due in part to its strong anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects.

    Reported side effects may include bloating, gas, heartburn, and nausea in certain people.

    Gingko
    (Leaf)

    Ginkgo leaf extract has been used to treat a variety of conditions such as asthma, bronchitis, fatigue, and tinnitus. It is also used to improve memory and to prevent dementia and other brain disorders. Some studies have supported its slight effectiveness. But exactly how gingko works isn't understood. Only extract from leaves should be used. Seeds contain ginkgo toxin. This toxin can cause seizures and, in large amounts, death. Because some information suggests that ginkgo can increase the risk of bleeding, it should not be used with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines, anticoagulants, anticonvulsant medicines, or tricyclic antidepressants.

    Ginseng
    (Root)

    Ginseng is used as a tonic and aphrodisiac, even as a cure-all. Research is uncertain how well it works, partly because of the difficulty in defining "vitality" and "quality of life." There is a large variation in the quality of ginseng sold. Side effects are high blood pressure and tachycardia. It's considered safe by the FDA. But it shouldn't be used with warfarin, heparin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines, estrogens, corticosteroids, or digoxin. People with diabetes should not use ginseng.

    Goldenseal
    (Root, rhizome)

    Goldenseal is used to treat diarrhea and eye and skin irritations. It is also used as an antiseptic. It is also an unproven treatment for colds. Goldenseal contains berberine, a plant alkaloid with a long history of medicinal use in both Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine. Studies have shown that goldenseal is effective for diarrhea. But it's not recommended because it can be poisonous in high doses. It can cause skin, mouth, throat, and gastric irritation.

    Milk thistle
    (Fruit)

    Milk thistle is used to treat liver conditions and high cholesterol, and to reduce the growth of cancer cells. Milk thistle is a plant that originated in the Mediterranean region. It has been used for many different illnesses over the last several thousand years, especially liver problems. Study results are uncertain about the actual benefits of milk thistle for liver disease.

    Saint John's wort
    (Flower, leaf)

    Saint John's wort is used as an antidepressant. Studies have shown that it has a small effect on mild to moderate depression over a period of about 12 weeks. But it is not clear if it is effective for severe depression. A side effect is sensitivity to light, but this is only noted in people taking large doses of the herb. St. John's has been shown to cause dangerous and possibly deadly interactions with commonly used medicines. It is very important to always talk with your healthcare provider before using this herb.

    Saw palmetto
    (Fruit)

    Saw palmetto is used to treat urine symptoms from benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). But recent studies have not found it to be effective for this condition. Side effects are digestive upset and headache, both mild.

    Valerian
    (Root)

    Valerian is used to treat sleeplessness and to reduce anxiety. Research suggests that valerian may be a helpful sleep aid, but the evidence is not consistent to confirm it. In the U.S., valerian is used as a flavoring for root beer and other foods. As with any medicinal herb, always talk with your healthcare provider before taking it.

    Medical Reviewers:

    • Bianca Garilli MD
    • Maryann Foley RN BSN
    • Rita Sather RN
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 15, 2021
  15. AAnightowl

    AAnightowl Young Pine

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2011
    Messages:
    1,540
    Likes Received:
    521
    Location:
    Missouri
    Another beneficial herb for infections is Prunella Vulgaris, or commonly known as heal-all, all-heal, carpenter's thumb, and other names.

    It is in the mint family, and when I got bit by a copperhead a few years back, I made a tea with it (it says that you can make a poultice with fresh leaves, but you never know what some animal has done to the fresh leaves...) I used the tea to treat the wound after surgery, and it healed up in only a few days.

    I did not know about this herb until I found it growing wild in my field and with pretty blue flowers. I dug some up and brought it to my yard, and it grows around my yard here and there.
     

Share This Page