Mystery houseplant- will it root?

Discussion in 'Plant ID' started by Saproxylic, Sep 2, 2016.

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  1. Saproxylic

    Saproxylic New Seed

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    My grandma has a gorgeous houseplant. I like it so much I decided to ''borrow'' a cutting and try to root it. I vaguely remember that she got the plant as a cutting herself, but I might be totally wrong on that one.

    I would love to find out what kind of plant is it and will it root from a cutting.

    It has grown about 20cm tall, but has long, creeping stems that stay upright while they are short but droop and hang later on, the longest ones are up to 50-60 cm long. it produces a huge number of stems (like ''impossible to see the pot'' huge number). I have seen it produce a brown cattail of tiny inconspicuous flowers at the end of the older stems occasionally. The stems are reddish, leaves egg shaped, about 3 cm in length on short reddish petioles and arranged in alternating manner, medium green with lighter underside, pretty thick.

    I'm attaching a few pics of the cutting I took (sorry, forgot to snap pic of the whole plant, while I was visiting). At the moment I let it dry up for a couple of hours and hen popped it in water hoping for it to root. mysteryplant1.jpg mysteryplant2.jpg
     
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  3. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    You need to break off the bottom leaf, the node where the leaf comes out of the stem is where the roots will grow from. Keep that part under water, you can cut the stem a little shorter so that will be easier.
     
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  4. Saproxylic

    Saproxylic New Seed

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    Thanks, toni! Did that! Any idea of the species?
     
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  5. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    It looks familiar but I don't know what it is. There are several members who have greenhouses and lots of indoor plants one of them should be on line at some point today and can ID it for you.
     
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  6. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    Looks like some kind of Peperomia. You only got one???? First rule is to get at least 3 stems. Then if one fails, you have better chances to get another one to grow. Agrees, don't cut the leaves off, rip them off. Then they may root out the leaf spot. Also if you can get more of them, you should plant one in good potting soil and put the small pot, in a saucer with a little water and that in a zip lock baggie closed. You have a little greeenhouse there. Open it when it gets real wet and seal it when it begins to dry out. You may get roots in about 6 weeks....Good luck..
     
  7. Saproxylic

    Saproxylic New Seed

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    Thanks guys! it really might be Peperomia! I can sure get more the next time I visit, there is a lot of that stuff! I'm trying water rooting at the moment because I haven't picked up any potting soil, got to pick up a baggie when I get paid!
     
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  8. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    When you go back you should take a picture of that beautiful plant. We would love to see the whole thing...
     
  9. Saproxylic

    Saproxylic New Seed

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    I came to visit again (still haven't purchased the soil, so no cutting taking this time) and took a full size photo of the plant! plantsymcplantface.jpg
    Arggh, I haven't figured out why it keeps posting them sideways (might it be an issue with software I use to rotate them?)
     
  10. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

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    For the one you are rooting in water,,if you have access to willow trees,,get a few snippings of the branches. Pound the ends a bit and put a few in the water with the plant. Willow produces the same hormone as is used in the powdered rooting hormone you buy. Maybe that will stimulate your cutting to grow. You can also use that water on the one in the potting soil. Then just replace the cuttings every couple of weeks or so.
     
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  11. purpleinopp

    purpleinopp Young Pine Plants Contributor

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    Looks like the plant sold as Peperomia orba.
     
  12. Saproxylic

    Saproxylic New Seed

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    Thank you guys! @mart does any kind of willow does the trick? I don't think I have any weeping willows around, but I do have seaside pussy willow!
     
  13. purpleinopp

    purpleinopp Young Pine Plants Contributor

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    Peperomias take root easily. Just snip & stick in a pot.
     
  14. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    Saproxylic, It doesn't matter what kind of Willow. It has salicylic and Indolebutyric acid. The highest concentration is in the tips of the branches. Mash or cut them up in water for a week. Dip the new clippings that you want to root and give it a little watering with it, only once.These chemicals will help keep fungi from growing and will encourage new growth in the plant.
     
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  15. purpleinopp

    purpleinopp Young Pine Plants Contributor

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    As said above, and whether using water or soil, a node (spot where a leaf connects to stem) needs to be submerged. Removing the lowest couple leaves if they are still attached to the piece in question is usually done when taking cuttings. Each node can theoretically take root, conditions permitting.
     
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  16. Saproxylic

    Saproxylic New Seed

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    The one cutting in water is starting to sprout tiny rootsies, I left it there to grow some more, and potted three more cutting, so I think I'll have lovely peperomia plants in no time (off topic, I got some lovely spider pant babies to pot as well!)
     
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