Need suggestions for rehabing section of garden

Discussion in 'Garden Design' started by Cayuga Morning, Apr 14, 2013.

  1. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    Here's the problem, deer munched yews, boring landscaping ( photo / image / picture from Cayuga Morning's Garden )

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    Here is same area during growing season. Rather messy. ( photo / image / picture from Cayuga Morning's Garden )
     
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  3. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    What are your plants in the bed? I think I see a couple of day lily, ornamental grass, ferns, a hosta in the background. What are the rest of the plants in the back and what is growing in the fore ground?

    Looks like you have a nice selection of plants. It just may be time to reorganize, clean and divide. Then you can add a few more.

    When reorganizing I would think about height and plant structure. Since the bed appears to be a fairly large (you can't easily reach all areas from the outside edges) I would include narrow mulch paths for maintenance.

    Annuals mixed with my perennials continue the color throughout the growing season. Calendula, poppies, and nasturtiums come back or me yearly. Since deer are a challenge for you there may be others better suited for your garden.

    With your bird feeding station right there it might be nice to include some berry producing shrubs for the birds.

    Whatever you decide to do be sure and post pics of your project. I have a street front piece that I need to rip out and start over with. Maybe your pics can give me some ideas too.
     
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  4. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    Thanks Jewell for your comments. It seems to me that this area of the garden is too much of a hodge-podge. And it is a very visible area, what you see from the sliders of my house.
     
  5. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

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    I think it looks nice all filled in... but over-crowded/over-grown.
    So maybe just some thinning out would do the trick?
    Or are you wanting an entire new look?
     
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  6. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    Cherylad, I think you and Jewell are right: the garden is overgrown. I should probably start by thinning out what I have.

    I am thinking of eliminating the yew on the left and putting in a red-twigged dogwood for winter color. Maybe add a bird bath to have a 'feature' to look at.

    To answer your question Jewell about what plants I have in the foreground, there is an azalea in the left, lower front, and the same azalea just above it on the left as well. In the lower bed I have daylilies and those are ground phlox spilling over the retaining wall. They used to look lovely, but they have petered out over the years.
     
  7. film495

    film495 Seedling

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    for some reason I picture a few small boulders, or a garden statue in there to have sort another element to look at.
     
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  8. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    film495, Yes I think that is a good idea. I have a bird bath I am experimenting with and a small fountain too....Jast haven't gotten 'the look' yet. Since last posting, I have cut down the left yew and pulled out the ground phlox spilling over the retaining wall. I have also added wheelbarrows of compost to the soil in the upper bed.

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    bird bath...not quite right ( photo / image / picture from Cayuga Morning's Garden )





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    Bird bath bowl now on a post...still not right, plus can't see it from inside. ( photo / image / picture from Cayuga Morning's Garden )





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    See? It is hidden behind the azalea on the left. ( photo / image / picture from Cayuga Morning's Garden )





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    This blue thing is a fountain. Today I will try putting that on the post. ( photo / image / picture from Cayuga Morning's Garden )





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    ( photo / image / picture from Cayuga Morning's Garden )
     
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  9. Droopy

    Droopy Slug Slaughterer Plants Contributor

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    Like Jewell said, it looks like you've got a nice selection of plants already. :D I like taller perennials, like that pretty grass of yours, a bit apart from each other and use small, flowering ground covers or smaller annuals/perennials in between. I also like evergreen shrubs or mini-trees in big, flat borders to give them structure and something to look at in winter.
     
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  10. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    Your cleaning has really made the structure of the beds stand out. :stew1: One thing you might consider is potting up as many of the perennials in good potting soil and start a little nursery of plants ( a holding bed). Dividing and potting up parts of clumps would give you more plants, and revitalize some of your perennials that have gotten "tired looking".

    I've been doing this the last couple of years. It has worked great for starting and maintaining beds. Then I give away any plants I have "left-over". I have been able to have many more phlox, asters, ornamental grasses, daisies, daylilies, bee balm, clematis, ground orchids, BC ginger and other assorted perennials. It also gives me room to try new perennials. :-D. Like Droopy I use self-seeding annuals to give me some initial color. Calendula works well for me if you like orange or yellow.

    Sounds like you are remembering winter interest and structure. I love the blue fountain. If you added another level between the bush on top and the bottom would that help? (I was thinking of placement for the bird bath.) Or be too much? A lot depends on your soil on whether terracing is easy or not (I've done a lot of terracing over the years and am always very pleased with the results).

    Wish I was there to get my hands dirty. Love this kind of project. :D
     
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  11. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    Jewell, Droopy, & Cherylad,

    Thanks for your input. The bed is actually smaller than it looks in the photos, too small to add another terrace. But I agree with you, there is something very eye catching about terracing. It shows off the plants very well.
    I like your idea of potting things up, clearing out the plot so you can see what you are doing. I have already removed the daylily (too spikey, plus I have daylilies on the lower level). I think I will encourage the hakone grass, add more snowdrops (bulbs) for early spring cheer. Add a red twigged dogwood for winter color. The azaleas on the left are actually very pretty in bloom. Then I think I will stop and figure out what else to do.

    Here is another photo of the area in growing season. Definitely a mess! The second photo is moving slightly to the right.

    I am thinking less is more. I need less variety, more of the same plants.

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    There is a planter of potato vine in front ( photo / image / picture from Cayuga Morning's Garden )





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    Late July. I definitely have too much going on. ( photo / image / picture from Cayuga Morning's Garden )
     
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  12. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    You have lots of great perennials there. I am sure you will having it look just like you want in no time.
     
  13. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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  14. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    Red twigged dogwood is filling in nicely. Here is a shot of it leafed out.

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    Red twigged dogwood on left, tulips on right! ( photo / image / picture from Cayuga Morning's Garden )
     
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  15. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    Thanks Henry! You've brought a smile to my face.
     
  16. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    Things are looking cheery with the little dogwood leafed out and those tulips. Keep us posted as the summer progresses.
     

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