New USDA hardiness map

Discussion in 'The Village Square' started by Clay_22, Nov 15, 2023.

  1. Clay_22

    Clay_22 In Flower

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  3. Mater

    Mater New Seed

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    Even though it says I'm 7b now, I still say I am 6b, which is what it was a decade ago. Last year it was 7a. Brown Turkey fig trees were lost last winter.
     
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  4. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    This because same here. The maps are just running averages. Below 10f took our figs down to the root twice over 20 years. It also does not include the dreaded spring frost risk so it is best to plan a level up for anything big and hard to replace.
     
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  5. Mater

    Mater New Seed

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    What variety of fig?
    Did you let them or did they grow back?

    I think the 0F low took out the Brown Turkey. If it had been 1F I think it would have helped alot.
     
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  6. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    Common, probably a brown turkey. It did not get as dark as the mission figs. It came from my in-laws. I finally just killed it because the sugi trees we used as a windbreak were fighting for the same space. I would not mind trying a Black Madeira as a replacement.
     
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  7. Daniel W

    Daniel W Hardy Maple

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    I didn't see this and posted the zone change too. It's fine with me if that is removed.

    My zone has shifted from about 7b to 8b over about 20 years. More than that, the summer is hotter and more dry. The net effect on most of my gardening seems to be beneficial. I'm getting more of the hot summer crops, and earlier. I do have to water more.

    I've been experimenting with plants that I thought might be good for a changing climate. Around here, planting conifers isn't wise anymore, despite being "The Evergreen State". They dry up too fast and become torches. Deciduous trees and shrubs seem less likely to do that.

    I wish I could grow date palms, but winters here would still do them in. Ditto for oranges.
     
  8. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic Young Pine

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    leave the posts. It cannot hurt.
     
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  9. AAnightowl

    AAnightowl Young Pine

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    It still says I am zone 6b which I have always been. (south central Missouri)

    Chicago hardy figs are said to grow here. I have not yet gotten any, but hope to. I have no idea of how they compare with mission figs. We used to be able to buy dried figs here, but it is quite rare to find them in the stores now. If you ask for figs, they look at you like you are from outer space or have two heads. They have no clue what figs are. On very rare occasions, you MIGHT find them at Walmart with other dried fruits.
     
  10. AAnightowl

    AAnightowl Young Pine

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    I would love to have date palms and coconut palms, and citrus trees.

    A friend is sending me some lemon seeds. I will plant some lemon trees, but they will have to be indoors at least in winter. Most lemons here are seedless. She sent me a tip for sprouting lemon seeds: it is to put the seeds into a banana, and they all sprout in the picture. I will try it.
     
  11. Daniel W

    Daniel W Hardy Maple

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    I have a Chicago Hardy fig tree, along with about ten other varieties. In my yard, it is one of the best producing fig trees. As for flavor, I think Black Mission figs are richer, but not by much. Also, I have not had fresh Mission figs to compare.

    I dry my figs in a food dehydrator. I think Chicago Hardy are as good in recipes as Black Mission figs. I like them a lot.
     
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  12. AAnightowl

    AAnightowl Young Pine

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    I hope I can get a fig tree or two for spring. I am not sure where to put it/them. They supposedly have invasive roots? Also the spot where I might put them, I have reserved for new washline posts. I lost my washline trees on the north side of my house in 2020, and the new ones have not yet gotten built. I had bought some metal T posts, but they are poor quality and don't work for me at all. I have those on the porch while I try to decide what to do with them. They cost $100 online, but are too short--the wash drags the ground and they do not allow the lines to be taut at all. They did not work for my grapevines either. I have the square posts and hardware and wire, but DS has not gotten them built yet.

    Q. re figs: are they sensitive to BLACK WALNUT trees? Because the spot on the south side of the house is rather near a few black walnut trees. :( At least the walnuts are not likely to kill my new washline posts.)
     
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