No mow grass in North Texas

Discussion in 'Lawn Care' started by vicky, Jul 14, 2007.

  1. vicky

    vicky New Seed

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    I am interested in no mow grass but most I have found is in cooler climates than we have in North Texas. Anyone have any information or contacts in the DFW area? thanks in advance.....
     
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  3. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    Hi Vicki welcome to the Stew from another north Texan.
    Please be sure to post an intro of yourself in the Welcome to GardenStew forum so we can get to know each other.

    Buffalo grass is the perfect no mow grass for this area. It grows to about 3-5 inches tall, can be mowed if you want but really doesn't have to be. It is a native prairie grass, doesn't require more water than the rain it gets except for extreme drought periods like last summer.
    This fall we are going to start taking up the water guzzling St. Augustine in our front yard and where I have to put in grass will be seeded with Buffalo grass.
     
  4. WTxDaddy

    WTxDaddy In Flower

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    Turfalo varieties?

    Check out this low-water grass. It was developed at Texas Tech University & is selling well on the South Plains of West Texas. Started off a sunny-variety, but I hear, they've developed a shade grass too. I don't know if it's "no-mow", but it is reputed to be low-water & very drought resistant (not that anybody needs that in the DFW area this year! I have a brother in Flower Mound, so I've heard about the rain.)

    http://www.turffalo.com/
     
  5. blackrose

    blackrose In Flower

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    Re: Turfalo varieties?

    Very promising!
     

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