novice needs help... what order for Hardcore and Planters?

Discussion in 'Garden Design' started by True North, Jun 26, 2007.

  1. True North

    True North New Seed

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    hey all,

    first post, so hello.

    I've had a couple of planters built for my new smallish front garden by a joiner friend.

    They are two intersecting boxes, one approx 1 metre square, the other approx 2.5 metres by 2 metres, from 5x8inch pressure treated something or other.

    For a quick scribble of what I trying to explain, see http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/vie ... id=9245956

    Neither have bottoms as I want then to sit directly on the ground, be filled with soil and the plants take their nutrients from the soil/ground.

    I'm then having the rest of the garden around the planters block paved with small sets (not by me, by a pro).

    My problem is what order do I do things in?

    Do I need the put the planters in then pack the hardcore around?

    Should I ask the pavers to put the hardcore in first then dig out what I don't need?

    How do I fix the planters in... simply hammer some long stakes into the earth and screw the planters to them. Should I concrete the stakes in?

    As you can tell, all help really appreciated.

    True North.
     
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  3. eileen

    eileen Resident Taxonomist Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    I would definately place the planters first TN and then have the hardcore put around them. Apart from this being less effort it will also look so much better, an neater, when completed.
    Do you really need to fix the planters in? I just put mine in place and they are fine. I think that, once you fill them with soil/multi purpose compost, the weight of them would allow them to stand firm. Also the hardcore will keep them in place once it sets. As long as the ground you place them on is level and free from large stones then I feel that your planters will stand on their own without any problems. :-D

    Do let us see some photographs, if possible, once you have the garden finished and the planters full of flowers won't you?
     
  4. bsewnsew

    bsewnsew Hardy Maple

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    Planter

    She is correct..
    The weight of the soil will be enough to hold it all in one spot....Sounds like a cute idea....How many are you putting in ?

    b
     
  5. True North

    True North New Seed

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    just the one - it's pretty big!

    The planter is now is situ and it's starting to come together.

    I now need to put a liner in to protect the wood from the soil.

    Is this simply a case of nipping to the local garden centre, buying a garden weed barrier type thing and stapling it to the inners?

    Also, (and I've posted this as a separate question in the forum) I'd like some advice on a tree.

    I've pulled down a overgrown/decaying fatsia (?) It had reaced approx 8/9 ft toall and whilst I liked the idea of having a 'tree' in that position in the gardem it didn't look very nice.

    What can I replace it with? Something nice looking, green all year preferably, not needing much tendering (perhaps a one-a-year tidy-up) growing to a height of 8-10ft and with a good 'bush size'.

    Any thoughts on the above would be most welcome.

    Thanks

    TN
     



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  6. eileen

    eileen Resident Taxonomist Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    TN I simply use plastic garbage sacks, slit open, to line my planters. I use staples to attach them to the wood. MUCH cheaper that anything you'll get from a garden centre - you don't need a weed barrier membrane for inside. Just remember to pierce some holes in the bottom for drainage. If you want to get some weed suppressant material it can be laid on top of the soil in your planters before the plants have gone in. Just cover it with decorative bark chippings or gravel and you'll have no more weeds!!
     
  7. bsewnsew

    bsewnsew Hardy Maple

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    eileen

    Eileen \\

    what a wonderful idea you come up with..

    I have some baskets that drain too fast.
    I think plastic is the answer.

    Thanks

    Barb :oops:
     
  8. True North

    True North New Seed

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    Eileen,

    can you advise me even more please???

    What else do I need in the planter apart from soil? A layer of gravel or anything similar. I will need to buy the soil in. Do I go for any particular type? From B-n-Q or a local garden centre with more of an idea?

    With regards to the plants, I like them to have quite a country cottage feel and be a little unkept in their appearance. No roses, nothing much above a foot tall and something to attract the bees and the butterflies.

    Where should I start looking for inspiration?

    Regards
     
  9. eileen

    eileen Resident Taxonomist Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    You can put a layer of small stone chippings into the bottom of your planters if you wish as this will help with drainage. You can even add water retaining crystals which means you won't have to water as often.

    How about aromatic herbs for your planting? They smell wonderful!! There are many low growing or trailing herbs you could use that come in a variety of textures and colours. They attract bees and butterflies too and have that slightly unkept, cottagey look you are after. Best of all you can use them in cooking which is an added bonus. :-D

    Here's a website that you might find of use:

    http://www.herbsociety.co.uk/schools/in ... omatic.htm
     

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