Phlox Propagation With Cuttings

Discussion in 'Seed Starting / Propagation' started by Sjoerd, Aug 14, 2009.

  1. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    That is great to hear that phlox so easily seeds out. You must indeed get some very interesting mutations. This propagation technique is used for phlox, but I use the same technique for most other plants which I propagate.
     
  2. Odif

    Odif In Flower

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    I am not sure if these are phlox, but this is the flower I mean, my wife says they are sweet williams. phlox.jpg
     
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  3. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Mate, they are indeed "Sweet Williams"--Dianthus sorts.
     
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  4. Odif

    Odif In Flower

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    My mistake, the plants look similar to Dianthus.
     
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  5. Ken Doman

    Ken Doman New Seed

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    The information on the phlox cuttings was very informative but I do have a couple questions if I may? It says to mix with sand and compost, would that be equal parts? Another question is that I've had some bad results in overwintering plants indoors, I'm in Illinois zone 5, when overwintering indoors should they be put in a sunny location? What I'm thinking of doing for one of the particular Phlox(very pretty color) is doing the cuttings now and I may luck out with roots by sometime in Sept, would you think that it would be ok to plant outdoors when roots develop? NOTE - I signed up on the Garden Stew site and then searched for where I can ask a question about the phlox cutting but could not find this blog, I had to go on the internet and found it via google.
     
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  6. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Hi,

    I shall try and answer your quezzies as best I can:

    1) Compost-sand mixture--
    I mixed mine by adding a little less than 1/3 sand and a bit more than 2/3rds compost. You could also use perlite instead of sand if you like. The purpose is to create adequate drainage for your cuttings.

    2) Overwintering indoors--
    I have never overwintered my phlox indoors, so I cannot give you info based upon experience; having said that, I do not think that it would not be a good idea to overwinter this perineal in a sunny place indoors, as I believe that the relative warmth and light may "confuse" the plant and it would make attempts to grow on and perhaps even flower...this would leave it in a weakened state when you would then plant it outdoors again in the spring. The phlox is a plant which normally grows outdoors and actually needs the "winter rest", where the foliage dies back and it becomes dormant.

    3) The last question I am not sure about. I am not sure about what you mean with the cuttings--
    Are you saying that you want top propagate phlox to plant indoors and use as a house-plant? or--do you mean to overwinter the phlox cutting indoors until next spring?
    If you would like to keep the new phlox cuttings indoors over the winter it is important to keep it in a cool and not too light place...not forgetting to give it a modicum of water once a month or so. Apply the water to the bottom of the plant...it is better to do this than giving the water directly to the top of the soil where fungus or bacteria could take hold on the stem at the soil line. You do this by setting the pot on a saucer or something shallowly deep.

    **4) I find that doing phlox cuttings at this time of year not an optimal time to perform this procedure. Personally, I would try it in the spring when the plant is growing it´s new growth. You would have a better chance of succeeding. However, all rules have exceptions--you could go ahead and try the procedure now and see how it work for you. Even if you fail, you will still have the experience of how to do the procedure. Give it a try.

    I hope that this has been clear to you. If not, let me know and we will discuss this further until you have a good understanding.
    Good luck with your cuttings.
     
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  7. Ken Doman

    Ken Doman New Seed

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    Thank you so very much for the information, I appreciate your expertise and am going to try and see if I can get some roots at this time. One more question if I may, if I do get roots would you think it would be ok to plant it outdoors in the shade. I have some store bought compost, do you think it's ok? Like you said, I have nothing to lose, I still have the rooted plant, thanks again!
     
  8. Ken Doman

    Ken Doman New Seed

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    One thing regarding Rose of Sharon, I think I goofed, I took some cuttings of 14 doubles about 6 " and put them in a mixture of equal parts coarse sand and potting soil. According to the Phlox info, I probably should have mixed 1/3 sand & 2/3 potting soil. Oh well, we'll see what happens!!
     

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