Question about clover in the vegetable garden

Discussion in 'Fruit and Veg Gardening' started by Cayuga Morning, Jul 4, 2019.

  1. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Hardy Maple Plants Contributor

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    Hi all,

    I have been trying to keep up with the weeding in my veggie garden. Amidst my onions is a fair amount of clover. If I leave it will it add nitrogen to the soil for the onions? Assume there is adequate water for both "crops".
    When I had my soil tested in the spring it was very high in phosphorus & potassium but very low in nitrogen. 2 other gardeners had the soil tested in their plots & the results were the same.
     
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  3. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    When annual clover dies it releases nitrogen from the nodules on it's roots into the soil for other plants to enjoy. Perennial clover releases nitrogen when the plant is mowed because a part of the root system dies with the mowing.
    Onions do not require a lot of nitrogen but they will benefit from what the clover releases into the soil.
     
  4. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Hardy Maple Plants Contributor

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    Thanks Toni
     
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  5. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic In Flower

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    So.. what I define as a weed...by me.

    Weeds will parasitically entwine their roots to my plants. If they do not then cool, no homo. But too many associates and the plant of purpose becomes burdened. Even if that plant dies later after the season, at which point its fertilizer sucking days are over, the damage being done.
     
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  6. Cayuga

    Cayuga New Seed

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    Ok. A-weeding I will go!
     
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  7. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

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    Personally Cayu--I would remove the clover and let it compost down on your compost pile...roots and all. I say that because in a veggie garden, you do not want competition for nourishment. The only plants to get nourishment ought to be the veggie plants that you are growing. The presence of other plants (helpful or not) will take us some of the food intended for your veggie plants.
    When composted you can re-apply the nodules and composted material back onto your plots later on.
     
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  8. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Hardy Maple Plants Contributor

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    Okay, sounds pretty unanimous to me. A-weeding I shall go!
     
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  9. Growingpains

    Growingpains Young Pine

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    I'm there with you, Cayuga. Weeds are prolific this summer. In spite of great bean supply, I still think there would greater abundance without all the grass, Plantain (?), a tiny weed with a lovely yellow flower. It takes more energy than I can muster to keep the gardens weed free, but I do keep trying.

    The worst is the Bindweed. Although it may be harmless, I simply cannot walk away unless I untwine / my word /the things from potato stems, tomatoes, garlic. onions, even kale!
     
  10. adam.ca

    adam.ca Seedling

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    I am battling the weeds also. the pile of discarded bits of weeds is growing fast.
     
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  11. Dirtmechanic

    Dirtmechanic In Flower

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    Regardless of the underground issues, nutrients lost and so forth, the real issue I have is how weeds harbor fungi and pass it on to my garden. All grasses have a form of leaf spot for example.
     
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  12. Growingpains

    Growingpains Young Pine

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    I'm torn between leaving them and pulling them.
     
  13. adam.ca

    adam.ca Seedling

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    when i go add some fertilizer ( once a month ) i make sure to do as much weeding as i can beforehand, don't want to be feeding the weeds...
     
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  14. Odif

    Odif In Flower

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    I have at least 3 different types of clover in the garden all with completely different root systems. Bulbing clover, these are hardest to get rid of but the least hassle to my veggies. Then there is the giant tufting clover and of course the type that makes a thick mat of roots and sends shoots up everywhere.
     
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  15. Growingpains

    Growingpains Young Pine

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    My daughter discovered a type of clover new to her. When I remember to ask for the name, I will post it.
     
  16. toni

    toni Mistress of Garden Junque Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    Clover is in the Legume family of plants....peas, bluebonnets etc. Those plants take nitrogen out of the air and fix it into the soil so it can be used by other plants. Just one of the reasons I leave clover alone in my garden.
     
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