Six Day Wonder

Discussion in 'Fruit and Veg Gardening' started by Sjoerd, Mar 24, 2024.

  1. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    20,413
    Likes Received:
    19,444
    It was exactly six days ago that we planted the beetroot seeds, among other things. Today when we were hanging up the laundry, I saw this little guy:
    IMG_3519.jpeg

    Later on in the day, we went up to hang the second load up and I found five more!
    The real surprise though is that they have come up on this, the sixth day. Every year the little beetroots do not germinate until the second or third week. You can see my surprise then.

    An interesting factor is that normally I plant them in situ where they will grow in the lottie. This year I am starting them off in cells on the bedroom windowsill.
    I am a happy gardener today.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2024
    Melody Mc., Frank, Logan and 2 others like this.
  2. Loading...


  3. S-H

    S-H Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,802
    Likes Received:
    2,850
    Location:
    Karachi, Pakistan
    I too am experiencing something strange of a similar nature. Like tomatoes sprouting spontaneously from the compost heap, and today I noticed some chili seedlings too in the heap...

    This never happened before with me. So obviously something in the environment is shifting. But exactly what? I do not yet know. However on the surface, if the net result is that we get more plants, then I at least won't complain.
     
    Pacnorwest and Sjoerd like this.
  4. Doghouse Riley

    Doghouse Riley Young Pine

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2019
    Messages:
    2,063
    Likes Received:
    5,099
    Location:
    South Manchester
    The clematis that I removed from the border next to the garage, "as they weren't doing anything," I've actually put in the pots in which the new ones came, with some fresh compost and put them on the shed windowsill. They may recover, in which case I'm sure I can find somewhere for them, if not they'll go in the bin.
     
    Pacnorwest likes this.
  5. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    20,413
    Likes Received:
    19,444
    S-H, i get the little sproutlings in compost and along the canal. It turned out that it was mice that would take smaller toms to eat along the water and on the compost. I usually just pull them out and toss them away, as I have limited growing room. I like to have control of what I grow and these wild sprouts cannot be accurately identified. They may be of a mixed parentage…which is not necessarily a bad thing, it is just that when I am experimenting, like to do the cross pollenating myself.

    I am also wondering if your compost gets hot enough. My piles sometimes do get hot enough to kill seeds and roots and some seasons not.
     
    Pacnorwest and S-H like this.



    Advertisement
  6. S-H

    S-H Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2010
    Messages:
    2,802
    Likes Received:
    2,850
    Location:
    Karachi, Pakistan
    Good question... Perhaps the clue is somewhere in the change of climate, which we in my part of the world are experiencing. Things like out of season rain. Which could indeed have cooled down the temperature of the compost.

    Otherwise during my entire life, I have never experienced any spontaneous sprouting of any type from the compost heap.
     
    Sjoerd and Pacnorwest like this.
  7. Pacnorwest

    Pacnorwest Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    May 16, 2018
    Messages:
    2,837
    Likes Received:
    6,504
    Heat temps is a huge issue for my compost piles. A soil temp gage comes in handy. Compost temperatures must reach 130 degrees which are enough to kill most weed seeds, but some of the tougher ones, bindweed, dock, groundsel, speedwell, and lambs quarters, can survive unless temperatures hit 145 degrees for at least a month. Usually in my climate for compost piles sits thru an entire summer to be sure the weed seeds are no loner viable. The compost piles are mostly from the horses of course. They have tons of seeds in their droppings, not to mention the wind currents that blow in weed seeds everywhere all winter. Sometimes I find new Doug fir tree seedlings and many other seedlings growing in the gutters.
     
    S-H and Sjoerd like this.

Share This Page