Take cuttings now

Discussion in 'Herb Gardening' started by marlingardener, Sep 8, 2014.

  1. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    9,419
    Likes Received:
    7,800
    Location:
    Central Texas, zone 8
    For those of us who grow herbs and want some fresh ones all winter, now is the time to take cuttings to root.
    I have basil and marjoram rooting in a 50/50 mix of perlite and vermiculite. All my other herbs will overwinter in the barn, and be available for snipping.
    The basil and marjoram will be on an east-facing window sill in the kitchen. They survived last winter (being moved to the counter on particularly cold nights).
    Fresh herbs, particularly in the winter, are a true joy!
     
    Frank, Sjoerd, Donna S and 1 other person like this.
  2. Loading...


  3. eileen

    eileen Resident Taxonomist Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2005
    Messages:
    28,005
    Likes Received:
    4,355
    Location:
    Scotland
    Thanks for the reminder Jane. I'll move my Basil now and snip off some cuttings before I forget.
     
  4. Sjoerd

    Sjoerd Mighty Oak

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    14,221
    Likes Received:
    6,832
    Good reminder. I started a couple of weeks ago with some plants. I must do the rest very soon.
     
  5. tkhooper

    tkhooper Seedling

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2014
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    United States
    Need to work on the sage it about 12 years old and leggy.
     



    Advertisement
  6. GardenSketch

    GardenSketch New Seed

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2014
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Thanks reminder! Contemplating just now how to best prep my herbs, and other perennials for winter.
     
  7. Shawchert

    Shawchert Seedling

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2014
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    186
    Location:
    United States
    I am having a hard time rooting my stevia cuttings, It's sad because I enjoy just chewing on the leaves in general :/. But i have a bunch of basil, though I haven't tried cuttings with anything else. *ponders*
     
  8. Donna S

    Donna S Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2010
    Messages:
    3,319
    Likes Received:
    2,568
    Location:
    Virginia
    Thanks Jane for the reminder.
     
  9. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    9,419
    Likes Received:
    7,800
    Location:
    Central Texas, zone 8
    Shawchert, I've found that stevia is harder to root than most herbs.
    However, if you take 8 to 10 cuttings, immediately dip them in rooting hormone (I use a powdered hormone available at most nurseries and also big box stores) and place them in a 50/50 mix of perlite and vermiculite that is well-dampened; keep them under a plastic cover with some air circulation (use 2 liter clear plastic pop bottles with the bottoms cut off and the cap off, lifted from the medium by a 1/4" or so) and out of direct sunlight; then you may get about 50% rooted.
    I hope this helps.
     
  10. mart

    mart Hardy Maple

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2010
    Messages:
    4,370
    Likes Received:
    2,351
    Location:
    NE Texas
    For those that like to use herbs but are short of growing space,,,I pick, wash and chop mine when they are growing best in summer. Then put them in plastic ice cube trays and freeze with a TBSP or so of water. Then just label a plastic freezer bag, and drop in the cubes and keep in the freezer.
    If you are rooting them, take twigs from a willow tree and soak in water. After a week or so you can just dip your cuttings in that water before putting them in the pot or dilute a bit and water the cuttings with it. Willow exudes the same hormone as the rooting hormone you buy. That's why you can stick a willow twig any moist place and it will root and grow. Works great for any hard to root plant.
     
    Shawchert likes this.
  11. Shawchert

    Shawchert Seedling

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2014
    Messages:
    217
    Likes Received:
    186
    Location:
    United States
    Thanks I suppose I will as my last stevia didn't root again, they do well in just plain water but if you put it in the soil it just dies; I will have to find somewhere that sells root horomones around my area so I can get started soon, I don't think my main stevia plant has much time left in it!!
     
  12. marlingardener

    marlingardener Strong Ash

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2010
    Messages:
    9,419
    Likes Received:
    7,800
    Location:
    Central Texas, zone 8
    Shawchert, many nurseries carry rooting hormone, as do Lowe's and Home Depot. A hint--put a bit of the hormone in a plastic bag or small jar and use that for dipping the cuttings. That way, if there is any disease, it doesn't affect the entire supply of hormone.
    Plants rooted in just plain water develop a different type of root than those rooted in a medium, such as potting soil or perlite, etc.
    Water developed roots are much more tender and easily broken, and also don't easily take up the needed nutrients when they hit soil.
    I hope your stevia roots for you!
     
    Shawchert likes this.
  13. petunia

    petunia Young Pine

    Joined:
    May 13, 2006
    Messages:
    2,295
    Likes Received:
    22
    Location:
    northern michigan
    I have picked up some new mint plants from our nursery this year as: orange mint, pineapple mint, apple mint. I already have lemon herb, peppermint. So a few weeks ago i rearranged my herbs I have growing in pots but they have found their way into the soil anyway :) I have taken cuttings and brought some inside.
    anyone with stevia I have been looking for cuttings or seeds please.
     

Share This Page