This year may be different

Discussion in 'Fruit and Veg Gardening' started by marlingardener, Feb 16, 2022.

  1. marlingardener

    marlingardener Happy

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    There seems to be a lack of vegetable seeds. Luckily, we have found most of the seeds that we want, but there are fewer varieties, higher prices per packet, and some have just disappeared.
    I tried ordering seeds but three of the suppliers who supposedly had the seeds we wanted had "out of supply" signs for some seeds on their websites.
    We can adjust--plant more of one variety of tomato and skip another, and have lots of green leaf lettuce and none of the red Oakleaf or Red Sails. Our salads may look a bit more boring but still will taste good!
    We are looking at this as a learning opportunity--we may find new varieties that we prefer. Yeah, right . . . .
     
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  3. Droopy

    Droopy Slug Slaughterer Plants Contributor

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    Ouch! I hear it's the same here but haven't checked since I won't be ready to grow vegetables this year. Either. What I do know is that everything plant related is more expensive this year than last year, and the year before, and everything sells out quickly. Seems the covid has made a lot of new gardeners.

    You can always grow some Tropaeolum majus (garden nasturtium?) to add colour to your salads. I like the taste of the flowers. We grow them now and then for summer colour, and then I use them in salads.I've also used borage and wood violet flowers. But I guess you already know this.
     
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  4. marlingardener

    marlingardener Happy

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    Ah Droopy, I had forgotten about nasturtiums, and we have grown borage in the past. Great ideas, and I thank you! I'll see if I can find seeds. One thing for sure, I'll be saving seeds this year rather than relying on suppliers.
     
  5. mart

    mart Strong Ash

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    I used to find the red oak leaf at the dollar stores called Italian blend! But last few years they haven't had all the little packets of seed ! Check Ebay for what you need, I have had good results from those I bought! Just check each companies feedback to see if there have been problems! If other buyers are happy it's usually a good place to buy!
     
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  6. Netty

    Netty Chaotic Gardener Plants Contributor

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    The seed variety in the stores is very limited this year here too. I ordered my seeds super early this year so I have what I need for this years garden.
    I'll be saving more seeds this year so I wont have to buy them next year.
     
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  7. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    I always let my lettuce plants go to seed. I have plenty of babies that crop up every year.
     
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  8. Daniel W

    Daniel W Hardy Maple

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    Last year I thought the seed prices were increasing, postage cost increasing, availability dropping too, so I saved seeds from more varieties than usual. It's a good idea this year if you have the room. Lettuce is very easy, just let a couple plants do their thing. They'll grow tall, bloom, make seeds. When the seed heads start to dry, store them in a dry place in a paper bag. After a month or two, you can crush the seed heads and blow off the chaff. Some things take too much room, like Swiss Chard. If you grow open pollinated tomato varieties, those are easy too. This year I chose more open pollinated types so that I can be more independent and develop better adapted varieties.

    Plant types I grow from saved seeds: Marigolds, cosmos, four o'clocks, zinnias, nasturtiums, echinacea, tomatoes, peppers, squashes, pumpkins, zucchinis, lettuce, shallots, cucumbers, cilantro. This year I plan to add onions (takes an extra year, they are biennial), more tomato and squash varieties, more pepper varieties. One thing I noticed, some of my home saved seeds had earlier and better germination than bought seeds of the same type. I don't know why. Also, if you always save seeds from your best ones, you gradually develop your own improved strains, more suited for your garden and area.
     
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