Water Damage Restoration

Discussion in 'Home Improvement, DIY and Repair' started by Aderek, Feb 23, 2023.

  1. Aderek

    Aderek New Seed

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    Water damage restoration is among the most complicated treatments that most houses ultimately experience. Homes that were mostly constructed with timber are specifically prone to major water damage since soaked wood and sheetrock produce ideal conditions for mold growth.
    The most important thing is the water damage restoration company you hired should be licensed and all the people who are involve in the fire damage restoration process must be insured. It is not just of the safety purpose but also because according to law the water damage restoration company must be licensed.
    The inspection of the damage begins with the repairing process. A team of professionals evaluate the total damage, the situation and which parts of the construction have been most affected by the water
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 1, 2024
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  3. Haskell

    Haskell New Seed

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    I agree. Hurricanes, floods, tsunamis cause irreparable damage to mankind. Water damage restoration is one of the most important tasks that must be done after the devastation to dry and dehumidify the property and avoid mold.
     
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  4. josephbut

    josephbut New Seed

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    The inherent susceptibility of wood and sheetrock to water infiltration creates an environment ripe for mold growth, compounding the complexity of the restoration process. In such situations, the choice of restoration company becomes paramount. Opting for a licensed and insured service provider not only ensures compliance with legal requirements but also guarantees the safety of everyone involved.
    When selecting a water damage restoration company, it's essential to prioritize expertise, reliability, and responsiveness. Fortunately, options like https://www.alldryus.com/texas/dallas-water-damage-restoration/ offer comprehensive services in the Dallas area, specializing in water damage restoration.
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2024
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  5. Pacnorwest

    Pacnorwest Hardy Maple

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    I agree water damage is the biggest most serious and complicated restoration for homes.
     



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  6. S-H

    S-H Hardy Maple

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    We over here in my part of the world only use wood as doors, kitchen cabinets, and coubords in the house. Even window frames are nowadays made from aluminum - While all the rest of the structure is made entirely from a scaffold of steel rebar, around which concrete is poured. Floors too are always either marble or mosaic. The entire structure is weather and fire proof for practically forever, as well as earthquake resilient.

    Wood is just way too costly to make houses out of here. And extremely maintenance hungry too, (also prone to attack by termites, plus a fire hazard too)... I guess in other parts of the world it would make sense to use wood as the main construction material to build homes out of, on the account of it being plentiful - But over here it's almost unthinkable.

    I can visualize that there must be a lot of practical reasons why such type of homes aren't built elsewhere, (outside of Asia, Middle East, and Africa). However, since this thread is all about water damage and restoration - I'd just like to share an alternate way of building homes. So that issues like water damage never ever occur on your property, which results in costly maintenance...

    Here is an example of what homes in my area look like during construction.



    And below is how such homes end up looking after construction.



     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2024
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  7. Pacnorwest

    Pacnorwest Hardy Maple

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    A lot of the newer homes in the US are constructed in the same way using steel and marble - stucco and concrete. Depending on the region and resources available. Many homes were framed with water proof lumber materials that are naturally water proof which include cedar, redwood, old-growth cypress, mulberry, yew, osage orange, and black locust. My home is all concrete, even the tile roof. But it’s older and framed with water proof wood before steel framing was available.

    Generally early on when homes were built in the PNW where lumber was a cheap strong and abundant material. Trees harvested from forests provided wood and lumber was a huge commodity built by the lumber and logging industry of the PNW.

    The biggest fire hazard on my property is the 3 acre garden full of trees, shrubs and different types of plant materials . However, the other buildings and roofs which are metal , typically used for the barn’s and out buildings .

    I also live next to an old growth forest, which is much of the PNW landscape. Very few rocks are on or near our area . Rivers , trees , lakes, ponds and mountain's are a strong landscape feature of the PNW , and a few volcanos…inactive since the 80’s.
    Other states in the US have very different and diverse climates, landscapes, building environments and materials.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2024
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  8. Daniel W

    Daniel W Hardy Maple

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    I would love to see that again! Not a disaster. I don't want anyone to suffer from it. So unrealistic of me, I know.
     
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  9. Pacnorwest

    Pacnorwest Hardy Maple

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    Daniel Did you go to St Helen’s at the visitor center? There is nice viewing area and center with photos and demos explaining the blast and how the trees and shrubs were brought back up to the top soil by pocket gophers…gophers - which are a pain in the caboose around here, but as I hate to say it are the hero’s of the new growth after the volcano explosion.

    To see a volcano you could take a trip to Hawaii. We have family that lives there and took us around to see all the gardens and volcano. It’s quite amazing to see how plants and animals bring the new land back to life.

    Pic showing the huge coconut palm seeds that float along the beaches blown up by the winds onto the ash are shown growing out of the ash left behind by the volcano . The coal black terrain for miles is shocking and then to see trees and shrubs cracking up and growing right thru the hardened ash .

    P1010181.jpeg
     

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