What to do with my Allium seeds. . . .

Discussion in 'Seed Starting / Propagation' started by lukeypukey, Aug 4, 2013.

  1. lukeypukey

    lukeypukey In Flower

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    Just gathered all my allium seeds now they've dried and split. Just wondered if these can be sown now?? and how this should be done???
     
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  3. Cayuga Morning

    Cayuga Morning Hardy Maple Plants Contributor

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    Hi Luke--
    I don't have any experience with sowing allium seeds, but it seems to me that that is what nature intends. If the plant has bloomed, the seeds have ripened, and are ready to fall to the soil....it seems to me that now would be the right time.

    I know sometimes we collect seeds & keep them in a fridge (or give them time in a freezer to simulate winter cold). But I think we do this because the critters would gobble the seeds up if we just left them to sow in the garden. My understanding is that most critters do not care for the onion relatives. I bet they would be safe in the garden if you could find a select place where you won't forget & disturb them. Good luck!
     
  4. Netty

    Netty Chaotic Gardener Plants Contributor

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    I'd plant them now!
     
  5. Palustris

    Palustris Young Pine

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    Sow the seed fresh. It germinates better straight from the plant rather than being dried off.
    Cover lightly with grit, gravel or whatever rather than compost.
    Sow in a deep pot rather than a seed tray (reasons later).
    Leave exposed to weather. They need a period of cold followed by warmth to initiate germination.
    When (if?) they germinate do not be in a hurry to p rick them out. This is the reason for deep pot rather than seed tray. They have only one root to begin with and if it is damaged, it dies and a new one has to be produced from the base of the seedling. usually they die.
    Feed the seed pot with dilute Baby Bio type stuff, until the leaves go yellow then allow the pot to dry off.
    Repotting may be done when they are dormant. Some types never really go dormant so be careful.
    I often do not repot until they have had another seasons growth. Remember many of them actually grow in late winter/early spring.
    Cannot think of anything else for the moment.
    Not as hard as it seems.
     



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  6. lukeypukey

    lukeypukey In Flower

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    Thank you all . . I'll get them in when I arrive home from work tonight :)
     
  7. margie12u

    margie12u In Flower

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    allium

    I wonder if you could winter sow them>
     

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