Wild Water Lilies... good or bad for a container garden?

Discussion in 'Water Gardening' started by cherylad, Aug 9, 2011.

  1. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

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    An old classmate/friend, who also owns about 100 acres behind us, stopped by the other day. When he noticed my container ponds with water lilies he said "I sure hope you didn't pay for those!". Naturally, I said that I had. Why?
    He said that one of his ponds is full of water lilies and that I could have all I wanted. My first thought was "Go get your tractor, let's get them now!"
    But what I said was, "Sounds great. I'll let you know."
    I was wondering if they might be either the wrong kind for a container? Or what if they had some sort of disease or something?
    Has anyone successfully grown water lilies from "the wild"?
     
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  3. carolyn

    carolyn Strong Ash

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    disease and insects. A whole new battle in getting nice plants.
     
  4. eileen

    eileen Resident Taxonomist Staff Member Moderator Plants Contributor

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    If you have the space and a spare container then I'd give a few of the wild waterlilies a try. After all nothing ventured - nothing gained. If they survive and look healthy enough then you know it's OK to get more from your friend. Good luck and I'll keep my fingers crossed for you.
     
  5. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

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    Hmmm... that would mean I'd have to set up another container. Tempting, indeed.
    I better give this some more thought before jumping into it.
     



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  6. Jerry Sullivan

    Jerry Sullivan Garden Experimenter Plants Contributor

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    A few years back I tried wild waterlilies in my pond. Being a shady yard I would get plenty of leaves but no flowers. Every once and a while a frog would sit on one of the leaves. They grew in about two feet of water and would survive the winter freeze. They lasted about 6 years but never flowered. More sun would have helped.

    Jerry
     
  7. Jewell

    Jewell Incorrigible Gardener Plants Contributor

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    Water lilies are like any other plant gotten from a friend. (I'd never share daylilies from one bed because of bindweed but i share everything else including waterlilies) My hardy pink waterlilies came from a local pond and I have never had any problems with them. Just make sure the tubers are clean and don't have any unwanted invasive aquatic plant (bits) attatched. Every year I give away many water lily starts. I'll bet you will be trying to find new homes for yours in no time because they will have multiplied so much. I'd take new water lilies if I liked the color.
     
  8. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

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    Jewell... I did ask if they were flowering and he said yes. Dumb me didn't ask what color! Next time he comes around, I'll see if I can get him to take me out that have a look.
     
  9. Jennym

    Jennym New Seed

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    Here are some steps I can share with you based on my one time experience in picking water lilies:

    1.You need to get the water lilies that are growing arm's length from the surface, settle on picking from the shallow area of the pond.

    2.Grasp the stem of the water lily you want to pick and gently reach for the roots with your fingers and loosen it from the ground.

    3.Cut the tuber away from the cluster with a knife and wrap it's root with a wet towel or place them in a container with water.

    4.After selecting all the water lilies that you want, you need to plant them on a pot with aquatic soil then you may submerge them in your own pond.

    Hope this helps. :)

    moderator's note: removed website link, see point 1.1 of usage rules
     
  10. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    Agree....but pick a plant that will be the same depth as your pond and rinse the whole plant in alum water then fresh water. That helps if it has buggers....
     
  11. waretrop

    waretrop Strong Ash Plants Contributor

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    Agree....but pick a plant that will be the same depth as your pond and rinse the whole plant in alum water then fresh water. That helps if it has buggers....
     
  12. cherylad

    cherylad Countess of Cute-ification Plants Contributor

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    All good advice if ever I work up the nerve to introduce a "wild" one to my containers.
     

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