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G: Words and Terms beginning with G




Category: Botanical Glossary | Posted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 2:40 am

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Glossary Index: http://www.gardenstew.com/blog/e10953-58-glossary-index.html

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Have a suggestion for a word or term? Please leave a comment below. Thank you,

Jerry



Genetic Engineering: The manipulation of a plant by introducing DNA from another plant. The artificial process is often called Gene Engineering. Example: GMO corn or soybeans

Germ: The small mass of cells in a seed necessary to start a new plant

Germinate: A process wherein a stimulated seed changes and begins the process to becoming a plant.

Genus: A classification of organisms between family and species. A genus consists of related species or segregates species with unusual characteristics.

GMO: Genetically Modified Organism is a plant whose genetic makeup has been altered by artificially changing the plant's DNA. Often done in food crops the new plants may have better yield per acre, better tolerance to cold or resistance to pests.

Grafting: Grafting is a technique to join the vascular tissue(inosculation) of two plants. Usually one for its roots(rootstock) and the other plant(scion) for its leaves, flowers or fruit. Usually accomplished by either of two methods, stem grafting or bud grafting.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Propagation Techniques' category.

Grafting - Bud: The process where a bud(scion) is grafted to a rootstock. The stock needs to have a vascular cambium active.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Propagation Techniques' category.

Grafting - Cleft/Wedge: The process where the top of the rootstock is horizontally trimmed, a vertical slit is made in the rootstock, the wedge(scion) is inserted into the slit, aligned and secured.The plant is bagged to maintain high humidity and kept out of the sun.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Propagation Techniques' category.

Grafting - Side-veneer:A graft wherein strips are removed from each of the rootstock and scion. The exposed flat areas of each are then sandwiched together and secured.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Propagation Techniques' category.

Grafting - Whip: A graft wherein the scion and understock are cut diagonally. A cleft is cut in each halfway between the toe and heel. Securely join the two making sure that the cambiums touch. Fasten with Rubber tape, raffia or wax yarn. Cover the joint completely with wax of tree wound compound.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Propagation Techniques' category.

Grass: A variety of herbaceous plants with narrow leaves growing from the base. Cultivated for lawns and growing wild in fields it has jointed stems and spiked flowers.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Plant Type' category.

Greenhouse: A glass or plastic structure with an artificial environment used for growing/maintaining plants and or seed or cutting propagation.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Suitable For' category.

Ground Cover: Low growing plants grown to accomplish any or all tasks such as: preventing soil erosion, crowding out or preventing weeds, covering a difficult area such as a hillside, providing greenery in deep shaded areas. Examples are: Pachysandra or Hedera helix - English Ivy.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Plant Type' category.

Growing Degree Days(GDD):GDD Measure accumulated heat to be used as a predictor of events sensitive to heat. Values above 50 Degrees For 10 Degrees C are added values below 50 Degrees For 10 Degrees C are subtracted. The result is the accumulated heat value.


Last edited: Tue Mar 01, 2016 7:25 pm

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