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Posted: 04 Nov 2014
I: Words and Terms beginning with I
Posted: 09 Nov 2014
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Posted: 06 Nov 2014
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Posted: 17 Nov 2014
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Posted: 02 Dec 2010

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Jerry Sullivan's Blog




H: Words and Terms beginning with H

Category: Botanical Glossary | Posted: Sun Nov 09, 2014 9:28 am

H

Glossary Index: http://www.gardenstew.com/blog/e10953-58-glossary-index.html

Have a suggestion for a word or term? Please leave a comment below. Thank you,

Jerry


(17)

Halosere:A community of plants in transition(seral) that can live in saline conditions i.e. a salt marsh

Halophyte: A plant that can tolerate a saline environment.

Hanging Basket A plant container suspended by rope, chain or plastic support typically used to display a suitable plant.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Suitable For category.

Hardiness zone: A geological area defining winter temperature used to denote limitations of plant viability. Often given in numbers ranging from 1(extreme cold) to 15(extreme heat)

Hastate: Shaped is pointed at the tip, widening to the base that forms pointed lobes resembling barbs.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under theLeaf Shape category.

Hedging/Screening A plant that grows with sufficient height and thickness to form a barrier and/or privacy.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Suitable For category.

Heliotropic: Most plants are heliotropic, in the sense that they adjust their leaf angles to intercept more sun in low light conditions (and some
also adjust to avoid light when subjected to heat or water stress).

Hemiepiphytic An epiphyte that spends only part of its life as a non terrestrial plant.

Herb:An herb is a seed bearing plant used to flavor food, provide fragrance and is used in medicine. As a non-woody plant herbs die back to the ground.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Herbaceous: Refers to non-woody plants that die back to the ground.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Houseplant: A plant located in a building usually to remove it from detrimental weather conditions.

Hip: The fruit of a rose

Hummingbirds: Refers to flowers that attract hummingbirds with sufficient nectar.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Humus: The product of decomposed plant material by organisms in the soil

hybrid: A plant that is the product of a cross between different species variety or genus.

Hydrosere: A community of plants living in a saline environment like a salt marsh

Hypogeal: Germination of a seedling where the cotyledon remains below the soil surface.

Last edited: Sat Sep 08, 2018 3:27 pm

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G: Words and Terms beginning with G

Category: Botanical Glossary | Posted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 2:40 am

G

Glossary Index: http://www.gardenstew.com/blog/e10953-58-glossary-index.html

(14)

Have a suggestion for a word or term? Please leave a comment below. Thank you,

Jerry



Genetic Engineering: The manipulation of a plant by introducing DNA from another plant. The artificial process is often called Gene Engineering. Example: GMO corn or soybeans

Germ: The small mass of cells in a seed necessary to start a new plant

Germinate: A process wherein a stimulated seed changes and begins the process to becoming a plant.

Genus: A classification of organisms between family and species. A genus consists of related species or segregates species with unusual characteristics.

GMO: Genetically Modified Organism is a plant whose genetic makeup has been altered by artificially changing the plant's DNA. Often done in food crops the new plants may have better yield per acre, better tolerance to cold or resistance to pests.

Grafting: Grafting is a technique to join the vascular tissue(inosculation) of two plants. Usually one for its roots(rootstock) and the other plant(scion) for its leaves, flowers or fruit. Usually accomplished by either of two methods, stem grafting or bud grafting.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Propagation Techniques' category.

Grafting - Bud: The process where a bud(scion) is grafted to a rootstock. The stock needs to have a vascular cambium active.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Propagation Techniques' category.

Grafting - Cleft/Wedge: The process where the top of the rootstock is horizontally trimmed, a vertical slit is made in the rootstock, the wedge(scion) is inserted into the slit, aligned and secured.The plant is bagged to maintain high humidity and kept out of the sun.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Propagation Techniques' category.

Grafting - Side-veneer:A graft wherein strips are removed from each of the rootstock and scion. The exposed flat areas of each are then sandwiched together and secured.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Propagation Techniques' category.

Grafting - Whip: A graft wherein the scion and understock are cut diagonally. A cleft is cut in each halfway between the toe and heel. Securely join the two making sure that the cambiums touch. Fasten with Rubber tape, raffia or wax yarn. Cover the joint completely with wax of tree wound compound.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Propagation Techniques' category.

Grass: A variety of herbaceous plants with narrow leaves growing from the base. Cultivated for lawns and growing wild in fields it has jointed stems and spiked flowers.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Plant Type' category.

Greenhouse: A glass or plastic structure with an artificial environment used for growing/maintaining plants and or seed or cutting propagation.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Suitable For' category.

Ground Cover: Low growing plants grown to accomplish any or all tasks such as: preventing soil erosion, crowding out or preventing weeds, covering a difficult area such as a hillside, providing greenery in deep shaded areas. Examples are: Pachysandra or Hedera helix - English Ivy.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the 'Plant Type' category.

Growing Degree Days(GDD):GDD Measure accumulated heat to be used as a predictor of events sensitive to heat. Values above 50 Degrees For 10 Degrees C are added values below 50 Degrees For 10 Degrees C are subtracted. The result is the accumulated heat value.

Last edited: Tue Mar 01, 2016 7:25 pm

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F: Words and Terms beginning with F

Category: Botanical Glossary | Posted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 2:38 am

F

Glossary Index: http://www.gardenstew.com/blog/e10953-58-glossary-index.html

Have a suggestion for a word or term? Please leave a comment below. Thank you,

Jerry

(20)

Falcate: A sickle shaped leaf
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under
theLeaf Shape category.
An example would be Helianthus maximiliani also found in the plants section

Fern:A fern is a non-flowering, vascular plant that reproduces by spores on leaves called fronds which unfurl from fiddleheads. Numbering between 9000 and 15,000 ferns are found from the tropics to temperate zones.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under
the Plant Type category.

Fertilizer: A substance organic or chemical used to enhance the soil and thus assist in the growing of plants and crops.

Filamentous: A plant with hair like fibers Example Yucca filamentosa

Fish - Shelter:Some fish will eat almost anything, including their own fry(newborn fish). Fry instinctively look for a hiding place after they hatch or are born. Aquatic vegetation provides an excellent area in which to hide during their development.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under
theWildlife Value category.

Fissure: A crack or opening in a plant or tree or the split of a seed pod about to open.

Fistule: A cylindrical opening as in a reed plant

Flabelate: Fan or half circle shaped. Examples: Ginkgo biloba(Maidenhair tree),
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under
theLeaf Shape category.

Flaccid: lacking moisture, limp or wilted

Flagging: A term used for the browning of leaves or needles on a tree.

Fleshy Root: Is the expanded root section used for underground storage of nutrients. Example: Daylily

Flora: plant life growing in an area

Flower Arranging/Drying: Flowers whose features lend well to drying and use in floral decorations.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under
theSuitable For category.

Founder: The first instance of a plant in an area that establishes a population of that plant. Example: A

Fragrant: Flowers that issue a pleasing scent that is pleasing to the olfactory senses.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under
the Plant Type category.

Frond: a fern or Palm leaf

Fruit: Fruit is the product of a fertilized flower used to disperse seeds.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under
the Plant Type category.

Full Shade: Less than 2 hours of direct sunlight during the day.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under
the Sun Exposure category.

Full Sun:Six hours or more of direct sunlight during the day. Not necessarily continuous.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under
the Sun Exposure category.

Funiculus: The connecting cord or tissue between the seed and the placenta. Easier to see looking at an immature seed.

Last edited: Thu Sep 14, 2017 12:52 pm

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E: Words and Terms beginning with E

Category: Botanical Glossary | Posted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 3:26 pm

E:

Glossary Index: http://www.gardenstew.com/blog/e10953-58-glossary-index.html

Have a suggestion for a word or term? Please leave a comment below. Thank you,

Jerry

(15)

Edging A border surrounding a garden comprising of material or flowers that defines the the edges.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Suitable For category.

Ecological succession The progression of plant species that occupy a given area after an ecological event, i.e. a fire Some species will only propagate after a wildfire. Others take advantage of a cleared area i.e. Fire Weed(Chamaenerion angulstifoium)

Ecophysiology: The study of organisms such as plants and the effect the environment has on them.

Elliptic: Oval, with little or no point as in a black cherry tree
You will find this word in the plants edit section under the leaf shape category.

Embryo: A plant embryo contains all the parts necessary within a seed to begin a new plant.

Endemic: Belonging to a particular area or region. As in a flower having come from an area of the world. Example: Daylilies are endemic to Northeast Asia.

Endocarp: The inner wall that covers seed in fleshy fruit.

Endosperm: Nutrient tissue within a seed that supplies the initial supply of food until the plant is able to take up nutrients on its own.

Epigeal: Germination of a seedling where the cotyledon is above the soil surface.

Epilithic: Growing on a rock as in an epiphyte growing on a rock. Example: Lichen.

Epiphytic: A plant growing on another plant using that plant for support but not drawing any sustenance from that host plant as does a parasite.
You will find this word in the plants edit section under the plant type category.

Epizoochory: The dispersal and distribution of seeds by transportation. The primary methodology of dispersal is attached to the fir of animals or the clothes of humans. The cleaning or shedding of fir or removal from clothing promotes distribution of seeds away from the originating plant.

Evergreen: A plant or tree that remains green throughout the year.
You will find this word in the plants edit section under
the plant type category.

Exotic: A plant that has been introduced to an area from elsewhere.

Expert: A person whose knowledge enables him/her to accomplish tasks with little difficulty.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Skill Level category.

Last edited: Sun Oct 22, 2017 5:13 pm

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D: Words and Terms beginning with D

Category: Botanical Glossary | Posted: Thu Nov 06, 2014 5:36 am

D

Glossary Index: http://www.gardenstew.com/blog/e10953-58-glossary-index.html

Have a suggestion for a word or term? Please leave a comment below. Thank you,

Jerry

(22)-

Deciduous: A plant of bush that as the nutrients retreat to the roots, loses its leaves as the fall and winter approach. The leaves are again renewed in the spring.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Deer Resistant: A plant that, under most circumstances, is avoided by deer for other more tasty fare. During stressful times, a starving deer will eat most anything.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Wildlife Value category.

Dehiscence:The process of the seed pod opening along a predetermined weakness. The process allows for the dispersal of seeds. Different from indehiscent.

Dentate: Toothed as in the edge of a leaf

Deltoid: A Delta shaped leaf with the stem connected at the point. Think of an upside-down pyramid with the stem attached to the point. This part may or may not be the entire leaf structure. A common Cottonwood tree has a deletion shaped leaf.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Leaf Shape category.

Dermal Tissue: Provides the outer protective layer of plants except trees and woody plants.

Desiccation: The process of having something dry out or be dried out.

Detritus: Organic material produced from dead and dying plants. This material enriches soil and contributes nutrients to epiphytic plants.

Determinate Growth Growth of a plant that is accomplished by a set of genetic instructions. The plant then ceases growth and fruit/flower output.

Diatoms: Single celled algae with a covering of silica.

Diatomaceous earth(DE): A soft sedimentary deposit formed from diatoms. Used as a natural insecticide.

Dicot: A flower who's seed has 2 cotyledon or leaf embryos.


Digitate: A leaf divided into finger like segments. As in Virginia creeper.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Leaf Shape category.

Diploid: A plant with two sets of chromosomes, one set from each parent plant.

Disjunct: The geographical disconnect of a species preventing a sharing of DNA between the isolated species.

Diurnal: In plants this usually refers to a flower being open during the day.

Division: The horticultural technique where a plant is separated into 2 or more separate plants maintaining roots and crowns in each plant.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Propagation Techniques category.

Dormancy: A period of inactivity or rest for plants and seeds.

Drip Line: A perimeter defined by the outer edge of a plant's leaf structure or in the case of trees, the leaf canopy.

Drip tip: An extension of a rainforest leaf that allows the plant to shed water and prevent fungus from forming.

Drought Tolerant: The ability of a plant species to withstand extended periods of time with little or no water.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Dry: Soil whose ability to hold moisture is reduced by the makeup of the soil, usually more sand and less organic material.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Soil Types category.

Last edited: Fri Jan 11, 2019 2:33 pm

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C: Words and Terms beginning with C

Category: Botanical Glossary | Posted: Wed Nov 05, 2014 2:27 pm

C

Glossary Index: http://www.gardenstew.com/blog/e10953-58-glossary-index.html

Have a suggestion for a word or term? Please leave a comment below. Thank you,

Jerry

(32)

Cacti: A succulent plant usually indigenous to dry areas of the Americas having a large spine and needle like leaves.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Callus: When rooting a cutting, drying the cutting end allows a callus to form. Roots can now form in the callus.

Calcareous: A soil type that has an abundance of calcium carbonate.

Cambium: The area of active plant tissue between the Xylem and the Phylum that provides additional support for the plant.

Carotenoid: The pigmentation in some vegetables and fruit that gives them their color. Carrots, bananas, corn, sweet potatoes and tomatoes have amounts of carotenoids.

Cavitation: the interruption of the xylem water flow by vapor bubbles caused by rapid changes in pressure.

Centre Piece: A floral arrangement are used to focus attention. often in the center of a table.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Suitable For category.

Chill Hours: Total numbers of hours required by a dormant plant with temperatures between 32Degrees F and 45 Degrees F. Winter hours above 45 Degrees F are subtracted.

Chlorophyll: Is a critical component in the process of photosynthesis. It is the pigment that gives plants their green color.

Chloroplasts: A specialized cell in a plant wherein photosynthesis occurs.

Clay / Heavy: Clay is defined more by the soil particulate size than by its chemical content. Clay is made up of particles less than 5 microns in size. A typical human hair by contrast is 100 microns
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Soil Types category.

Climber: A plant that wraps itself around structures to achieve hight and thus access to more sunlight.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Circadian Rhythm: The daily cyclical activity of life forms that is influenced by the 24 hour day.

Circumnutation: The periodic movement of a plant tip in response to light, temperature, chemicals and time of day. Patterns of circular, elliptical, helical and other movements are a response to stimuli that allow the plant to seek additional growing space or a new area to thrive. Example: Morning Glory.

cladophyll: The flattened portion of a stem who's functions and appearance resemble that of a leaf.

Clone: A group of plants reproduced vegetatively from a single plant.

Coastal Garden: Plants that will tolerate wind and salt spray.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Suitable For category.

Compost: Decayed organic material used to augment soil. Example: dead leaves, garden refuse and manure

Conifer:An evergreen with needle leaves and that bares cones.

Container/Patio: A garden wherein the plants are grown in pots, often made of clay or grown in window boxes.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Suitable For category.

Cordate: A heart shaped leaf with the stem attached to the indentation of the leaf.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Leaf Shape category.

Corm: An underground root that is swollen to store nutrients during winter and during periods of dryness.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Cortex: The outer layer of a plant stem or root.

Cottage Garden: Informal in design a cottage garden features a mixture of ornamental and edible plants. Plantings are often compact with little regard to spacing.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Suitable For category.

Cotyledon: The embryonic portion of a seed appearing as the first leaves of the plant after germination.

Cultivar: A plant that has been produced by selective breeding. Seeds of the plant are often not like the parent plant.

Cuneate: Refers typically to the triangular base of a leaf where the stem attaches.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Leaf Shape category

Cuticle: The protective wax coating produced by the plant epidermis to prevent moisture loss. Example: Hosta

Cutting: a portion of a plant used for vegetative propagation.

Crypsis: Describes a method of camouflage. Example: an insect that blends in with a tree trunk or leaf.

Cytokinins: Are substances used in the process of cell growth called cytokinesis and have to do with plant cell division and differentiation.
Reference: http://www.gardenstew.com/about31374.html

Cytoskeleton: Plants have an internal structure called a cytoskeleton which supports the various parts of the plant. When you rotate a plant a process called phototropism swings into action. Parts of the plant supported by the cytoskeleton called microtubules are severed at various junction points and new microtubules are joined to aid the plant in re-orienting itself toward the strongest light.
Reference: http://www.gardenstew.com/about31198.html

Last edited: Tue Jul 03, 2018 10:19 pm

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B: Words and Terms beginning with B

Category: Botanical Glossary | Posted: Tue Nov 04, 2014 4:53 am

B

Glossary Index: http://www.gardenstew.com/blog/e10953-58-glossary-index.html

Have a suggestion for a word or term? Please leave a comment below. Thank you,

Jerry

(30)

Backcross: A hybrid using a hybrid and one of the parents.

Bark: A tough outer coating of tall woody plants covering the cambium.

Basal: The bottom or base. Example: The basal plate of a bulb is the bottom portion from which the roots grow.

Bedding: Plants that add color in spring and summer to a garden bed. Commonly colorful annuals or biennials. Examples: marigolds, impatiens alyssum and Shasta daisies.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Bees: A social or solitary insect noted for pollinating flowers and crops.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Wildlife Value category.

Beginner: A person who has yet to acquire skills necessary to overcome the many problems associated with gardening.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Skill Level category.

Berry: A fleshy fruit, one flower and containing one ovary with multiple seeds, examples: avocados, grapes, tomatoes, etc.

Biennial: A plant whose life cycle takes two growing seasons to go from seed to plant to flower to seed.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Biomass: Total of living material, living or recently dead in a given area. Biomass can be animal, vegetable or both. Biomass can also be expressed as energy.

Bioturbation: The shifting of soil or sediment by the activities animals and plants.

Bipinnate: Having the leaflets that themselves have been divided into smaller leaflets. An example would be a cut twice fern like Athyrium asplenioides(Southern Lady Fern)
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Leaf Shape category.

Bird - food (fruit/berries/insects/seeds): A plant, bush or tree that provides sustenance to birds.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Wildlife Value category.

Bird - shelter (nesting/thorns): A bush or tree with sufficient density or deterrence necessary to keep nests from harm or that provides birds a suitable shelter from inclement weather.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Wildlife Value category.

Bog: A area saturated with water whose plant life is acclimated to a constant wet existence.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Bog Garden/Waterside: An area with an abundance of saturated soil to sustain plants or trees that require roots to be in a very moist media.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Suitable For category.

Boggy: Saturated soil usually found near a source of water or low lying topography.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Soil Types category.

Bole: The portion of a tree trunk below the lowest branches.

Border/Bed: The area of a garden defined as the margin next to a lawn or other clearly discernible entity e.g. water.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Suitable For category.

Botany: The scientific study of plants. Botany comes from the Greek word botane, which means "grass" or "pasture."

Bract: A leaf like structure, usually small, just below a flower or inflorescence. A larger example : Poinsettia

Bryology: The study of mosses.

Bryophyte: Non-vascular plants. Examples: Mosses, liverworts and hornworts.

Bulb: An underground plant structure, a true bulb has 5 parts: a basal plate(the bottom of the bulb), fleshy scales(where the food is stored), a tunic (which protects the scales), a shoot(which has a premature flower), and lateral buds or bulblets.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Bulb - Chipping: The process of dividing a bulb by cutting into 8 to 16 vertical sections(tip to basal plate) and isolating them in a bag of growing medium.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Propagation Techniques category.

Bulb - Scaling: Propagation of a bulb by removing and planting individual scales. Example: Lilies
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Propagation Techniques category.

Bulb - Twin Scaling: Propagation of a suitable bulb by dividing a chip with part of the basal intact. Sections are then planted in a bag of medium in darkness until bulblets form.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Propagation Techniques category.

Bulbils: Small bulbs that develop on the plant scape. Example: Garlic or Tiger Lily.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Propagation Techniques category.

Butterflies (nectar source): A flower frequented by butterflies because of the abundance of nectar. Flowers that attract feeding butterflies. Examples: lupine, lavender and Phlox to name a few.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Wildlife Value category.

Butterflies (larvae/caterpillar food): Plants that the larvae find tasty. Adult butterflies lay eggs nearby to repeat the propagation cycle.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Wildlife Value category.

Butterfly Garden A garden designed with plants frequented by butterflies.
Examples: Purple Cone flower(Echinacea purpurea), Phlox (paniculata) and Joe Pye Weed(Eutrochium)
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Suitable For category.

Last edited: Sat Mar 23, 2019 2:34 pm

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A: Words and Terms beginning with A

Category: Botanical Glossary | Posted: Mon Nov 03, 2014 10:31 pm

A

Glossary Index: http://www.gardenstew.com/blog/e10953-58-glossary-index---6323722611.html

Have a suggestion for a word or term? Please leave a comment below. Thank you,

Jerry


(36)

Abscisic acid(ABA): A hormone that assists the plant in coping during times of stress i.e. drought, extremes in temperature and exposure to salt water.
abscisic acid also inhibits seed germination.

Abscission: Triggered by the lack of chlorophyll abscission causes a plant to lose leaves or fruit usually in the fall.

Acclimatization: The adjustment by a plant to changes in its environment. Example: Temperature, light, humidity, or pH.

Achene: The dry fruit of a flowering plant containing one seed. Examples: clematis, acorn and sunflower

Acicular: A thin needle shaped leaf. Think of pine needles, each needle is a leaf with an acicular shape.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the leaf shape category.

Acidic (Strongly) <5.5: Less desirable as soil for many plants strongly acidic soil is often the result of acid rain, farm fertilizer or mining tailing runoff. However, plants like blueberries, rhododendrons and azaleas as well as white potatoes and conifer trees do well in strongly acidic soil.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Soil pH category

Acidic (Medium) 5.5 - 5.9: Defines the H+ or Hydrogen ions in soluble water which in turn dictates the ability of plants to absorb nutrients. Plants have evolved over time to live in soil with a range of pH values.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Soil pH category


Acidic (Slightly) 6.0 - 6.4: Defines the H+ or Hydrogen ions in soluble water which in turn dictates the ability of plants to absorb nutrients. Plants have evolved over time to live in soil with a range of pH values. Many plants do well in this range.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Soil pH category


Acidic (Very slightly) 6.5 - 6.9: Defines the H+ or Hydrogen ions in soluble water which in turn dictates the ability of plants to absorb nutrients. Plants have evolved over time to live in soil with a range of pH values. Many plants do well in this range.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Soil pH category


Acidic / Peaty: Soil as defined by the amount of Hydrogen ions. Acidity increases as the H+ increases. Plants are less able to absorb nutrients as the acidity of the soil increases. Yet some plants have evolved to do well in acidic soil.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Soil Type category.

Aculeate: Having a sharp point or prickly as in a thorn or a bur

Acuminate: A leaf that tapers gradually to a point. Like an American Beech tree leaf.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the leaf shape category.

Adventitious Root: A root that grows from an unexpected location like a joint or leaf. Example: Philodendron

Aerial Plant: Originating or growing above the ground. Example: Tillandsia and Spanish Moss, an air plant.

Alkaline / Chalky: Soil with a pH above 7.0, often found in dryer climates.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Soil Type category.

Alkaline (Very slightly) 7.1 - 7.5: Soil with an elevated amount of sodium compounds and a reduced amount of hydrogen ions.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Soil pH category

Alkaline (Slightly)7.6 - 8.0: Soil where nutrients for plants are less available. Few plant nutrients devolve well above a pH of 7.5
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Soil pH category

Alkaline (Medium) 8.1 - 8.5: A soil with a moderate amount of sodium compounds and low amount of hydrogen ions
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Soil pH category

Alkaline (Strongly)>8.5: A poor clay type soil with a high concentration of sodium carbonate
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Soil pH category

Allelopathy: A defensive mechanism by plants wherein it produces chemicals to inhibit growth of other plants in proximity to itself. Examples are black walnut and hickory trees as well as other plants like sunflowers.
Reference: http://www.gardenstew.com/about32847.html

Alpine/Rock Garden: A garden display theme depicting the mountainous tundra found above the tree line.
You will find this term in the Plants edit section under the Suitable for category.

Alternate: A leaf arrangement where there is one leaf per node. Other arrangements are two or more leaves per node.An example:Barberry (Berberis thunbergii),Japanese zelkova (Zelkova serrata)
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the leaf shape category.

Alpine:Plants that have adapted to the harsh conditions above the tree line in mountainous areas of the world.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Anisotomic: branching of unequal diameters, with a large main branch and smaller adjacent branches

Annual: A plant who's life cycle from seed to propagation is accomplished in one growing season.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Plant Type category.

Annular Forming a ring or circle

Anthocyanins: Pigmentation that provides reds and purples in fruit and vegetables. Always present in leaves, the pigments show up in the fall as leaves stop making chlorophyll and photosynthesis ceases. Examples: apples, cherries, plums, beets, cabbage and blueberries to name a few. Suggested by Cayuga Morning.

Anisotomic: Branching of dissimilar size limbs, resulting in one large and several small branches

Annual Ring: Circular formations of spring and summer wood in the tree trunk indicating the yearly cycles.

Anthesis The bloom period of a flower


Apical bud: The bud located at the topmost(apex) part of a plant.

Apical dominance: The process wherein the central shoot or stem of a plant or tree inhibits the growth of lateral stems in order to attain hight thus improving chances of more sunlight and improved photosynthesis.

Aquatic Plant: Plant species that grow in water: whose seeds germinate in water or in the bottom soil of bodies of water, usually having submersed or floating leaves.

Architectural: Plants that provide the permanent structure of a garden. While the plantings are often evergreens that add greenery for the winter months, deciduous bushes and trees also provide different shape,texture and color to the landscape during the summer months.
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the Suitable For category.

Aristate: A leaf whose apex(the part away from the stem) comes to a stiff sharp point. Example: American Hackberry
You will find this word in the Plants edit section under the leaf shape category.

Autotrophic: A plant that supplies its own food by turning inorganic material into food. Example: process of photosynthesis

Last edited: Fri Oct 26, 2018 12:48 am

This blog entry has been viewed 1080 times


Gremlins, the untold story.

Category: The back yard | Posted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 10:52 pm

It was the summer of 1947. The war was still fresh in people's minds. Prosperity was featured everywhere as the economy shifted gears and a peacetime entrepreneurs grabbed for new opportunities. All of this eluded the mind of a three year old, three and a half if you asked me. My father was starting a new job which meant we had to move to a new city. Still, most of this was beyond my world. The only thing I remember was the final trip to the new house. The two cats, Tanny and Wanny were put into a bag for the trip. They did not like the bag much less the trip. We moved to a big house and only we lived there. The house we moved from had more people. A family upstairs and a family downstairs and there were lots of kids. The new house came with my fathers job, along with a car. He was so close he could walk to work. It was across the street. The house had lots of rooms, everything was big. Even I had a room! As we settled into our new home a blackboard appeared on the kitchen wall. I asked about the 'black thing' on the wall. My father explained by writing something on the board with chalk. I was even more amazed when he erased the words with a cloth. Only when he explained that, aided by a kitchen chair, I could reach the board I could use the it instead of having to ask for scrap paper and a pencil. I could draw pictures and erase them!! I drew our new house, it was a fine drawing. Doors, windows a roof and even a chimney, my artistic skills were obvious, well at least to me. It was bedtime, so grudgingly off I went. The next morning I wanted to show my mother my drawing. I went to the kitchen. Horrors!! There, all over my drawing were these little creatures!! How did they get there. My sister explained, "Gremlins". My father concurred, "Gremlins" I erased the drawing and started over. Try as I may the Gremlins frequently appeared. Not always, but enough to make drawings frustrating at times. And they have never gone away :-)


Jerry





Last edited: Tue Feb 24, 2015 12:11 pm

This blog entry has been viewed 320 times


Plants face 60 ton behemoth and certain death!!

Category: The back yard | Posted: Fri Jan 06, 2012 11:52 pm

The days were growing colder and the garden was quiet. The plants were in their late fall slumber mode when the call came. "Hello, Mr. Sullivan, this is the tree service". I had called them earlier in fall to have them remove several trees including a 100+ ft white pine. "We will be there on the 19th". I hung up the phone and glanced into the yard. While I had moved a flower bed that was blocking access to the tree, I had still had to remove a couple of yucca filamentosa. The yuccas had a long pedigree having been originally planted in 1905 by my grandmother at the family summer home. After my folks passed I removed several bushes and plants including the yuccas to my home. They now stood in the way of the crane that would remove the giant pine. I unlocked the toolshed and grabbed a shovel. I was not thrilled to unearth the yuccas so late in the season but a 60 ton crane, no matter how cautious the preparations, makes a deep lasting impression.


( photo / image / picture from Jerry Sullivan's Garden )

Thirty years of living in the same spot lends to lots of roots and the two plants in question were very happy plants. Grudgingly the yuccas yielded to the shovel and because they were too heavy to lift, were dragged away in a tarp to a prepared hole.
True to their word the tree people with two cranes appeared in our driveway mid morning prepared for the day's work.


( photo / image / picture from Jerry Sullivan's Garden )


Preparations to minimize the damage to the lawn by 60 tons of steel did little to appease the plants watching the unfolding events from the sidelines.


( photo / image / picture from Jerry Sullivan's Garden )

Bushes trembled as the giant passed them on its way to do battle with the doomed pine.


( photo / image / picture from Jerry Sullivan's Garden )

While the smaller crane and workmen made easy work of the oak trees,


( photo / image / picture from Jerry Sullivan's Garden )

The larger crane set up camp 60 feet from the targeted pine.


( photo / image / picture from Jerry Sullivan's Garden )

The Queen of hearts in Alice in Wonderland could not have said it better, "OFF WITH IT'S HEAD!!"


( photo / image / picture from Jerry Sullivan's Garden )

The giant crane lifted the severed conifer's top over the onlooking plants and spectators, its 180 year reign had come to an end. The threat of falling during a hurricane ended by the stroke of the woodsman's chainsaw.


In a corner of the yard two very unhappy yuccas spent the winter. The spring could not come fast enough. For one spring never came, however, several pups survived the winter to take its parents place in the old vacant hole. The other plant weathered the cold season, surviving but with a diminished capacity, it was glad to soak up the springtime warmth back in its old home.

A bonus of severed roots is that the old hole now has 19 more yuccas of varying sizes and a volunteer (from seed) has taken up residence within sight of the new young yucca. It will take a few years for the new and transplanted Yucca to gain/regain a respectable stature but time is on their side. As long as the leviathans stay away.


Jerry


































Last edited: Sat Jan 07, 2012 12:24 am

This blog entry has been viewed 1013 times




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